Evaluation of the efficacy of antibacterial medical gloves in the ICU setting

M. Kahar Bador, V. Rai, M. Y. Yusof, W. K. Kwong, O. Assadian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Inappropriate use of medical gloves may support microbial transmission. New strategies could increase the safety of medical gloves without the risk of patient and surface contamination. Aim: To compare the efficacy of synthetic antibacterial nitrile medical gloves coated with polyhexamethylen-biguanid hydrochloride (PHMB) on the external surface with identical non-antibacterial medical gloves in reducing glove contamination after common patient care measures in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Methods: ICU staff wore either standard or antibacterial gloves during patient care activities. The number of bacteria on gloves was measured semi-quantitatively immediately after the performance of four clinical activities. Findings: There was a significant difference in mean bacterial growth [colony-forming units (cfu)] between control gloves and antibacterial gloves {60 [standard deviation (SD) 23] vs 16 (SD 23) cfu/glove imprint, P<0.001}. In three of the four clinical activities (intravenous fluid handling, oral toilet and physiotherapy), the antibacterial gloves had significantly less bacterial contamination compared with the control gloves (P=0.011 and <0.001, respectively). Although antibacterial gloves showed lower bacterial contamination after changing linen compared with control gloves, the difference was not significant (P=0.311). Conclusion: This study showed that use of antibacterial medical gloves significantly reduced bacterial contamination after typical patient care activities in 57% of the investigated clinical activities (P<0.01). The use of antibacterial medical gloves may support reduction of cross-contamination in the ICU setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-252
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015

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Intensive Care Units
Patient Care
Stem Cells
Bedding and Linens
Nitriles
Bacteria
Safety
Growth

Cite this

Kahar Bador, M. ; Rai, V. ; Yusof, M. Y. ; Kwong, W. K. ; Assadian, O. / Evaluation of the efficacy of antibacterial medical gloves in the ICU setting. In: Journal of Hospital Infection. 2015 ; Vol. 90, No. 3. pp. 248-252.
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abstract = "Background: Inappropriate use of medical gloves may support microbial transmission. New strategies could increase the safety of medical gloves without the risk of patient and surface contamination. Aim: To compare the efficacy of synthetic antibacterial nitrile medical gloves coated with polyhexamethylen-biguanid hydrochloride (PHMB) on the external surface with identical non-antibacterial medical gloves in reducing glove contamination after common patient care measures in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Methods: ICU staff wore either standard or antibacterial gloves during patient care activities. The number of bacteria on gloves was measured semi-quantitatively immediately after the performance of four clinical activities. Findings: There was a significant difference in mean bacterial growth [colony-forming units (cfu)] between control gloves and antibacterial gloves {60 [standard deviation (SD) 23] vs 16 (SD 23) cfu/glove imprint, P<0.001}. In three of the four clinical activities (intravenous fluid handling, oral toilet and physiotherapy), the antibacterial gloves had significantly less bacterial contamination compared with the control gloves (P=0.011 and <0.001, respectively). Although antibacterial gloves showed lower bacterial contamination after changing linen compared with control gloves, the difference was not significant (P=0.311). Conclusion: This study showed that use of antibacterial medical gloves significantly reduced bacterial contamination after typical patient care activities in 57{\%} of the investigated clinical activities (P<0.01). The use of antibacterial medical gloves may support reduction of cross-contamination in the ICU setting.",
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Kahar Bador, M, Rai, V, Yusof, MY, Kwong, WK & Assadian, O 2015, 'Evaluation of the efficacy of antibacterial medical gloves in the ICU setting', Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 90, no. 3, pp. 248-252. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2015.03.009

Evaluation of the efficacy of antibacterial medical gloves in the ICU setting. / Kahar Bador, M.; Rai, V.; Yusof, M. Y.; Kwong, W. K.; Assadian, O.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 90, No. 3, 01.07.2015, p. 248-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of the efficacy of antibacterial medical gloves in the ICU setting

AU - Kahar Bador, M.

AU - Rai, V.

AU - Yusof, M. Y.

AU - Kwong, W. K.

AU - Assadian, O.

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - Background: Inappropriate use of medical gloves may support microbial transmission. New strategies could increase the safety of medical gloves without the risk of patient and surface contamination. Aim: To compare the efficacy of synthetic antibacterial nitrile medical gloves coated with polyhexamethylen-biguanid hydrochloride (PHMB) on the external surface with identical non-antibacterial medical gloves in reducing glove contamination after common patient care measures in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Methods: ICU staff wore either standard or antibacterial gloves during patient care activities. The number of bacteria on gloves was measured semi-quantitatively immediately after the performance of four clinical activities. Findings: There was a significant difference in mean bacterial growth [colony-forming units (cfu)] between control gloves and antibacterial gloves {60 [standard deviation (SD) 23] vs 16 (SD 23) cfu/glove imprint, P<0.001}. In three of the four clinical activities (intravenous fluid handling, oral toilet and physiotherapy), the antibacterial gloves had significantly less bacterial contamination compared with the control gloves (P=0.011 and <0.001, respectively). Although antibacterial gloves showed lower bacterial contamination after changing linen compared with control gloves, the difference was not significant (P=0.311). Conclusion: This study showed that use of antibacterial medical gloves significantly reduced bacterial contamination after typical patient care activities in 57% of the investigated clinical activities (P<0.01). The use of antibacterial medical gloves may support reduction of cross-contamination in the ICU setting.

AB - Background: Inappropriate use of medical gloves may support microbial transmission. New strategies could increase the safety of medical gloves without the risk of patient and surface contamination. Aim: To compare the efficacy of synthetic antibacterial nitrile medical gloves coated with polyhexamethylen-biguanid hydrochloride (PHMB) on the external surface with identical non-antibacterial medical gloves in reducing glove contamination after common patient care measures in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Methods: ICU staff wore either standard or antibacterial gloves during patient care activities. The number of bacteria on gloves was measured semi-quantitatively immediately after the performance of four clinical activities. Findings: There was a significant difference in mean bacterial growth [colony-forming units (cfu)] between control gloves and antibacterial gloves {60 [standard deviation (SD) 23] vs 16 (SD 23) cfu/glove imprint, P<0.001}. In three of the four clinical activities (intravenous fluid handling, oral toilet and physiotherapy), the antibacterial gloves had significantly less bacterial contamination compared with the control gloves (P=0.011 and <0.001, respectively). Although antibacterial gloves showed lower bacterial contamination after changing linen compared with control gloves, the difference was not significant (P=0.311). Conclusion: This study showed that use of antibacterial medical gloves significantly reduced bacterial contamination after typical patient care activities in 57% of the investigated clinical activities (P<0.01). The use of antibacterial medical gloves may support reduction of cross-contamination in the ICU setting.

KW - Antibacterial glove

KW - Medical glove

KW - Surface transmission

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DO - 10.1016/j.jhin.2015.03.009

M3 - Article

VL - 90

SP - 248

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JO - Journal of Hospital Infection

JF - Journal of Hospital Infection

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ER -