'Event' TV Drama within Narrative Ecosystems: 'Extended Seriality' and Differing Paratextual Orientations in the 50th Anniversaries of Cult TV Shows

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Cult television has been recurrently debated and defined in scholarship, with particular attention being paid to whether it is an audience-activated and fan-generated status or whether textual criteria can be discerned. This chapter focuses on the 50th anniversaries of three different cult TV series: Doctor Who, Thunderbirds, and Star Trek. Doctor Who began on November 23rd, 1963. And for the vast majority of its run, it became synonymous in the UK with Saturday night entertainment. Thunderbirds began on September 30th, 1965. The show's golden anniversary in 2015 featured a remake, now titled Thunderbirds Are Go!, which had its opening episode screened on ITV1 on April 4th. Star Trek began on September 8th, 1966. Star Trek has evidently made good use of 'extended seriality' in the past, cleverly linking together its different franchise entries in episodes such.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationReading Contemporary Serial Television Universes
Subtitle of host publicationA Narrative Ecosystem Framework
EditorsPaola Brembilla, Ilaria A. De Pascalis
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter11
Pages184-200
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781315114668, 9781351628365
ISBN (Print)9781138071391
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Publication series

NameRoutledge Advances in Television Studies

Fingerprint

Seriality
Cult
TV Drama
Star Trek
Ecosystem
Doctors
Remake
Entertainment
Franchise
TV Series
Night

Cite this

Hills, M. (2018). 'Event' TV Drama within Narrative Ecosystems: 'Extended Seriality' and Differing Paratextual Orientations in the 50th Anniversaries of Cult TV Shows . In P. Brembilla, & I. A. De Pascalis (Eds.), Reading Contemporary Serial Television Universes: A Narrative Ecosystem Framework (pp. 184-200). (Routledge Advances in Television Studies). New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315114668
Hills, Matthew. / 'Event' TV Drama within Narrative Ecosystems : 'Extended Seriality' and Differing Paratextual Orientations in the 50th Anniversaries of Cult TV Shows . Reading Contemporary Serial Television Universes: A Narrative Ecosystem Framework. editor / Paola Brembilla ; Ilaria A. De Pascalis . New York : Routledge, 2018. pp. 184-200 (Routledge Advances in Television Studies).
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Hills, M 2018, 'Event' TV Drama within Narrative Ecosystems: 'Extended Seriality' and Differing Paratextual Orientations in the 50th Anniversaries of Cult TV Shows . in P Brembilla & IA De Pascalis (eds), Reading Contemporary Serial Television Universes: A Narrative Ecosystem Framework. Routledge Advances in Television Studies, Routledge, New York, pp. 184-200. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315114668

'Event' TV Drama within Narrative Ecosystems : 'Extended Seriality' and Differing Paratextual Orientations in the 50th Anniversaries of Cult TV Shows . / Hills, Matthew.

Reading Contemporary Serial Television Universes: A Narrative Ecosystem Framework. ed. / Paola Brembilla; Ilaria A. De Pascalis . New York : Routledge, 2018. p. 184-200 (Routledge Advances in Television Studies).

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Hills M. 'Event' TV Drama within Narrative Ecosystems: 'Extended Seriality' and Differing Paratextual Orientations in the 50th Anniversaries of Cult TV Shows . In Brembilla P, De Pascalis IA, editors, Reading Contemporary Serial Television Universes: A Narrative Ecosystem Framework. New York: Routledge. 2018. p. 184-200. (Routledge Advances in Television Studies). https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315114668