Everyday death: How do nurses cope with caring for dying people in hospital?

Jane B. Hopkinson, Christine E. Hallett, Karen A. Luker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the UK, policies on health recognise the importance of supporting healthcare professionals if they are to realise their potential for delivering quality services. Little is known about how nurses working in hospitals cope with caring for dying people and, hence how they might be best supported in this work. This paper reports a qualitative study informed by phenomenological philosophy, which developed a theory of how newly qualified nurses cope with caring for dying people in acute hospital medical wards. On the basis of the theory, interventions are proposed that could help support nurses in their work with dying people.

LanguageEnglish
Pages125-133
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studies
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Health Policy
Delivery of Health Care

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Everyday death : How do nurses cope with caring for dying people in hospital? / Hopkinson, Jane B.; Hallett, Christine E.; Luker, Karen A.

In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 125-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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