Evolution of radiation-induced lattice defects in 20/25 Nb-stabilised austenitic stainless steel during in-situ proton irradiation

C. Barcellini, R. W. Harrison, S. Dumbill, S. E. Donnelly, E. Jimenez-Melero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have monitored in situ the lattice defect evolution induced by proton irradiation in 20Cr-25Ni Nb-stabilised stainless steel, used as fuel cladding material in advanced gas-cooled reactors. At 420 °C, the damaged microstructure is mainly characterised by black spots and faulted [Formula presented]〈111〉 Frank loops. Defect saturation is reached at only 0.1dpa. In contrast, at 460 °C and 500 °C proton bombardment induces the formation of a mixture of [Formula presented]〈111〉 Frank loops and perfect [Formula presented]〈110〉 loops. These perfect loops evolve into dislocation lines that form a dense network. This transition coincides with the saturation in the dislocation loop size and number density at 0.8dpa (460 °C) and 0.2dpa (500 °C), respectively. The presence of a high density of dislocation loops and lines at those two temperatures causes a vacancy supersaturation in the matrix, leading to the formation of voids and stacking fault tetrahedra.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-100
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Nuclear Materials
Volume514
Early online date19 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

Fingerprint

Gas cooled reactors
Proton irradiation
proton irradiation
Crystal defects
austenitic stainless steels
Supersaturation
Stainless Steel
Stacking faults
Austenitic stainless steel
Vacancies
Protons
Stainless steel
Radiation
Defects
Microstructure
defects
radiation
Temperature
gas cooled reactors
saturation

Cite this

@article{41213121fbc24a11b4d7c32e122be756,
title = "Evolution of radiation-induced lattice defects in 20/25 Nb-stabilised austenitic stainless steel during in-situ proton irradiation",
abstract = "We have monitored in situ the lattice defect evolution induced by proton irradiation in 20Cr-25Ni Nb-stabilised stainless steel, used as fuel cladding material in advanced gas-cooled reactors. At 420 °C, the damaged microstructure is mainly characterised by black spots and faulted [Formula presented]〈111〉 Frank loops. Defect saturation is reached at only 0.1dpa. In contrast, at 460 °C and 500 °C proton bombardment induces the formation of a mixture of [Formula presented]〈111〉 Frank loops and perfect [Formula presented]〈110〉 loops. These perfect loops evolve into dislocation lines that form a dense network. This transition coincides with the saturation in the dislocation loop size and number density at 0.8dpa (460 °C) and 0.2dpa (500 °C), respectively. The presence of a high density of dislocation loops and lines at those two temperatures causes a vacancy supersaturation in the matrix, leading to the formation of voids and stacking fault tetrahedra.",
keywords = "Advanced gas-cooled reactor, Austenitic stainless steel, Dislocation analysis, In-situ proton irradiation, Transmission electron microscopy",
author = "C. Barcellini and Harrison, {R. W.} and S. Dumbill and Donnelly, {S. E.} and E. Jimenez-Melero",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.11.019",
language = "English",
volume = "514",
pages = "90--100",
journal = "Journal of Nuclear Materials",
issn = "0022-3115",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Evolution of radiation-induced lattice defects in 20/25 Nb-stabilised austenitic stainless steel during in-situ proton irradiation. / Barcellini, C.; Harrison, R. W.; Dumbill, S.; Donnelly, S. E.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

In: Journal of Nuclear Materials, Vol. 514, 02.2019, p. 90-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evolution of radiation-induced lattice defects in 20/25 Nb-stabilised austenitic stainless steel during in-situ proton irradiation

AU - Barcellini, C.

AU - Harrison, R. W.

AU - Dumbill, S.

AU - Donnelly, S. E.

AU - Jimenez-Melero, E.

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - We have monitored in situ the lattice defect evolution induced by proton irradiation in 20Cr-25Ni Nb-stabilised stainless steel, used as fuel cladding material in advanced gas-cooled reactors. At 420 °C, the damaged microstructure is mainly characterised by black spots and faulted [Formula presented]〈111〉 Frank loops. Defect saturation is reached at only 0.1dpa. In contrast, at 460 °C and 500 °C proton bombardment induces the formation of a mixture of [Formula presented]〈111〉 Frank loops and perfect [Formula presented]〈110〉 loops. These perfect loops evolve into dislocation lines that form a dense network. This transition coincides with the saturation in the dislocation loop size and number density at 0.8dpa (460 °C) and 0.2dpa (500 °C), respectively. The presence of a high density of dislocation loops and lines at those two temperatures causes a vacancy supersaturation in the matrix, leading to the formation of voids and stacking fault tetrahedra.

AB - We have monitored in situ the lattice defect evolution induced by proton irradiation in 20Cr-25Ni Nb-stabilised stainless steel, used as fuel cladding material in advanced gas-cooled reactors. At 420 °C, the damaged microstructure is mainly characterised by black spots and faulted [Formula presented]〈111〉 Frank loops. Defect saturation is reached at only 0.1dpa. In contrast, at 460 °C and 500 °C proton bombardment induces the formation of a mixture of [Formula presented]〈111〉 Frank loops and perfect [Formula presented]〈110〉 loops. These perfect loops evolve into dislocation lines that form a dense network. This transition coincides with the saturation in the dislocation loop size and number density at 0.8dpa (460 °C) and 0.2dpa (500 °C), respectively. The presence of a high density of dislocation loops and lines at those two temperatures causes a vacancy supersaturation in the matrix, leading to the formation of voids and stacking fault tetrahedra.

KW - Advanced gas-cooled reactor

KW - Austenitic stainless steel

KW - Dislocation analysis

KW - In-situ proton irradiation

KW - Transmission electron microscopy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056863224&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.11.019

DO - 10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.11.019

M3 - Article

VL - 514

SP - 90

EP - 100

JO - Journal of Nuclear Materials

JF - Journal of Nuclear Materials

SN - 0022-3115

ER -