Experimental and numerical study on lean premixed methane-hydrogen-air flames at elevated pressures and temperatures

Erjiang Hu, Zuohua Huang, Jiajia He, Haiyan Miao

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81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experimental and numerical study on the lean methane-hydrogen-air flames at elevated pressures and temperatures was conducted. The unstretched laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained over a wide range of hydrogen fractions at elevated pressures and temperatures. The sensitivity analysis and flame structure were also analyzed. The results show good agreement between the computed results and experimental data. The unstretched laminar burning velocities are increased with the increase of initial temperature and hydrogen fraction, and they are decreased with the increase of initial pressure. With the increase of initial pressure and hydrogen fraction, Markstein lengths are decreased, indicating the increase of flame instability. Laminar burning velocity is depended on the competition between the main chain branching reaction and chain recombination reaction. The chain branching reaction is a temperature-sensitive reaction, while the recombination reaction is a temperature-insensitive reaction. Numerical study shows that the suppression (or enhancement) of overall chemical reaction with the increase of initial pressure (or temperature) is closely linking to the decrease (or increase) of H, O and OH mole fractions in the flames. Strong correlation is existed between burning velocity and maximum radical concentrations of H and OH radicals in the reaction zone of premixed flames.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6951-6960
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy
Volume34
Issue number16
Early online date17 Jul 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2009
Externally publishedYes

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