Exploring an agency-communion model of identity transformation in recovery from substance misuse

David Rowlands, Donna Youngs, David Canter

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Abstract

Background: Narrative research shows that identity change is key to recovery from substance misuse. Theories have focused on either personal or social factors in this process. A framework encompassing Agency and Communion has been useful in understanding narratives in similar populations. Objectives: The study proposes that substance misuse and recovery can be understood from an Agency-Communion perspective. Method: The Life As A Film Task (LAAF) and repertory grids were used to explore Agency and Communion in a sample of 32 participants. Results: Smallest Space Analysis of LAAF items revealed four different narratives according to themes of Agency and Communion. Case examples indicated that Agency and Communion predicted a recovery identity, and the absence of Agency and Communion predicted substance misuse. Analysis of repertory grids showed fixed low Agency/Communion construct systems in cases of substance misuse and transformed high Agency/Communion construct systems in cases of recovery. Transformation from a low Agency/Communion substance-using identity toward a high Agency/Communion recovery identity was highlighted. Conclusions: These preliminary findings illustrate the role of Agency and Communion processes in identity-transforming recovery from substance misuse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-272
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Substance Use
Volume24
Issue number3
Early online date6 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2019

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abstract = "Background: Narrative research shows that identity change is key to recovery from substance misuse. Theories have focused on either personal or social factors in this process. A framework encompassing Agency and Communion has been useful in understanding narratives in similar populations. Objectives: The study proposes that substance misuse and recovery can be understood from an Agency-Communion perspective. Method: The Life As A Film Task (LAAF) and repertory grids were used to explore Agency and Communion in a sample of 32 participants. Results: Smallest Space Analysis of LAAF items revealed four different narratives according to themes of Agency and Communion. Case examples indicated that Agency and Communion predicted a recovery identity, and the absence of Agency and Communion predicted substance misuse. Analysis of repertory grids showed fixed low Agency/Communion construct systems in cases of substance misuse and transformed high Agency/Communion construct systems in cases of recovery. Transformation from a low Agency/Communion substance-using identity toward a high Agency/Communion recovery identity was highlighted. Conclusions: These preliminary findings illustrate the role of Agency and Communion processes in identity-transforming recovery from substance misuse.",
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Exploring an agency-communion model of identity transformation in recovery from substance misuse. / Rowlands, David; Youngs, Donna; Canter, David.

In: Journal of Substance Use, Vol. 24, No. 3, 04.05.2019, p. 265-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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