Exploring how young people think about and respond to diabetes in their peers

Joanna Brooks, Nicky Kime, Nigel King, Alison Wearden, Warren Gillibrand, Fiona Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adolescence is a difficult time for people with diabetes and it is often accompanied by a deterioration in blood glucose control. This article looks at the effect the attitudes of peers can have on adolescents with diabetes. Three focus groups of 12–14-year-olds were asked about their knowledge of diabetes and were then presented with realistic vignettes about the condition, which they discussed. They then took part in a myth-busting session to help address misconceptions. The research team identified themes that emerged from the focus groups. Their findings suggest that a supportive peer network may be a valuable resource in good management of diabetes in young people. The research team suggest that more education about the condition is needed in schools and should be designed in collaboration with young people with diabetes
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-18
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes Care for Children & Young People
Volume4
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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chronic illness
adolescence
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Cite this

Brooks, Joanna ; Kime, Nicky ; King, Nigel ; Wearden, Alison ; Gillibrand, Warren ; Campbell, Fiona. / Exploring how young people think about and respond to diabetes in their peers. In: Diabetes Care for Children & Young People. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 14-18.
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Exploring how young people think about and respond to diabetes in their peers. / Brooks, Joanna; Kime, Nicky; King, Nigel; Wearden, Alison; Gillibrand, Warren; Campbell, Fiona.

In: Diabetes Care for Children & Young People, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2015, p. 14-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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