Exploring the Perspectives of Clinical Professionals and Support Staff on Implementing Supported Self-Management for Asthma in UK General Practice

An IMP2ART Qualitative Study

Susan Morrow, Luke Daines, Sharon Wiener-Ogilvie, Liz Steed, Lorna McKee, Ann Louise Caress, Stephanie J.C. Taylor, Hilary Pinnock

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite an overwhelming evidence base, supported self-management of asthma is poorly implemented into routine practice. Strategies for implementation must address organisational routines, as well as provide resources for patients and training to improve professionals' skills. We aimed to explore the priority that primary care practices attach to asthma self-management, to describe their existing asthma management routines, and to generate innovative implementation strategies. We recruited 33 participants (23 general practitioners; seven nurses; three administrative staff) from 14 general practices. The 12 interviews and three focus groups were transcribed, coded and analysed thematically. Supported self-management was largely a nurse-led task within clinic-based annual reviews. Barriers included poor attendance at asthma clinics, lack of time, demarcation of roles, limited access to a range of tailored resources, and competing agendas in consultation, often due to multimorbidity. Suggestions for initiatives to improve the provision of supported self-management included emphasising the evidence for benefit (to influence prioritisation), improving teamwork (including team-based education), organisational strategies (including remote consulting) which need to fit within existing practice routines. Technology offers some potential solutions (e.g., improved templates, 'app'-based plans), but must be integrated with the practice information technology systems. Building on these insights, we will now develop a theoretically-based implementation strategy that will address patient, professional, and organisational buy-in, provide team-based education and offer a range of practical options and tools, which can be adapted and integrated within existing routines of individual practices.

Original languageEnglish
Article number45
Number of pages7
Journalnpj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Self Care
General Practice
Asthma
Nurses
Technology
Education
Focus Groups
Information Systems
General Practitioners
Comorbidity
Primary Health Care
Referral and Consultation
Interviews

Cite this

Morrow, Susan ; Daines, Luke ; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon ; Steed, Liz ; McKee, Lorna ; Caress, Ann Louise ; Taylor, Stephanie J.C. ; Pinnock, Hilary. / Exploring the Perspectives of Clinical Professionals and Support Staff on Implementing Supported Self-Management for Asthma in UK General Practice : An IMP2ART Qualitative Study. In: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 1.
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Exploring the Perspectives of Clinical Professionals and Support Staff on Implementing Supported Self-Management for Asthma in UK General Practice : An IMP2ART Qualitative Study. / Morrow, Susan; Daines, Luke; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Steed, Liz; McKee, Lorna; Caress, Ann Louise; Taylor, Stephanie J.C.; Pinnock, Hilary.

In: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 1, 45, 18.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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