Family carers' experiences of out-of-hours community palliative care

A qualitative study

Nigel King, Dennise Bell, Keri Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carers' feelings of uncertainty and anxiety can be particularly acute out-of-hours, when they may not have access to familiar sources of professional help and advice. The present study used qualitative semi-structured interviews to explore carers' experiences of out-of-hours care and support services. Fifteen bereaved carers in the Calderdale and Kirklees area were interviewed, and the interview transcripts analysed thematically. In general, carers felt well supported out-of-hours, especially by the nursing services. They appreciated opportunities to develop some degree of personal relationship with those they saw out-of-hours. However, in some cases problems were apparent. These were associated with poor provision of information, inadequate communication with carers, difficulties in accessing night-sitter services, or the inflexibility of services. The findings underline the importance of primary care practitioners taking an anticipatory approach to community palliative care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-83
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Palliative Nursing
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2004

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Palliative Care
Caregivers
Interviews
Nursing Services
Uncertainty
Primary Health Care
Emotions
Anxiety
Communication

Cite this

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Family carers' experiences of out-of-hours community palliative care : A qualitative study. / King, Nigel; Bell, Dennise; Thomas, Keri.

In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.02.2004, p. 76-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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