Firearm-assisted suicide

Legislative, policing and clinical concerns

Kiran Sarma, Diarmuid Griffin, Susanna Kola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Until recent years the Republic of Ireland had one of the most restrictive regimes on firearms access with the Irish police (An Garda Siochana) consistently refusing to grant certificates for a wide range of guns including handguns, high calibre rifles and shotguns capable of holding more than three cartridges. In 2004 the High Court ruled that this policy was without legislative backing and since then the police began to issue certificates for firearms where the applicant is not disentitled under law from possessing a gun. Set against this backdrop, this paper explores the consequences of liberal gun regimes in the context of access to firearms by those suffering from mental illness and who pose a threat of parasuicide or suicide. Consideration is given to experiences in other jurisdictions and international research on firearm suicide prevention. Finally some recommendations for changes in legislation, policy and protocol in the Irish context are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-37
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Assisted Suicide
assisted suicide
Firearms
suicide
certification
police
regime
applicant
mental illness
Ireland
jurisdiction
republic
legislation
threat
Law
Police
Suicide
experience
Self-Injurious Behavior
Legislation

Cite this

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Firearm-assisted suicide : Legislative, policing and clinical concerns. / Sarma, Kiran; Griffin, Diarmuid; Kola, Susanna.

In: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 33-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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