First steps towards underdominant genetic transformation of insect populations

R. Guy Reeves, Jarosław Bryk, Philipp M. Altrock, Jai A. Denton, Floyd A. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The idea of introducing genetic modifications into wild populations of insects to stop them from spreading diseases is more than 40 years old. Synthetic disease refractory genes have been successfully generated for mosquito vectors of dengue fever and human malaria. Equally important is the development of population transformation systems to drive and maintain disease refractory genes at high frequency in populations. We demonstrate an underdominant population transformation system in Drosophila melanogaster that has the property of being both spatially self-limiting and reversible to the original genetic state. Both population transformation and its reversal can be largely achieved within as few as 5 generations. The described genetic construct {Ud} is composed of two genes; (1) a UAS-RpL14.dsRNA targeting RNAi to a haploinsufficient gene RpL14 and (2) an RNAi insensitive RpL14 rescue. In this proof-of-principle system the UAS-RpL14.dsRNA knock-down gene is placed under the control of an Actin5c-GAL4 driver located on a different chromosome to the {Ud} insert. This configuration would not be effective in wild populations without incorporating the Actin5c-GAL4 driver as part of the {Ud} construct (or replacing the UAS promoter with an appropriate direct promoter). It is however anticipated that the approach that underlies this underdominant system could potentially be applied to a number of species.

LanguageEnglish
Article numbere97557
Number of pages9
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 May 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Genetic Transformation
genetic transformation
Insects
Genes
insects
Population
Refractory materials
double-stranded RNA
RNA Interference
genes
promoter regions
Gene Knockdown Techniques
Chromosomes
dengue
Dengue
Drosophila melanogaster
genetic engineering
malaria
Malaria
Culicidae

Cite this

Guy Reeves, R. ; Bryk, Jarosław ; Altrock, Philipp M. ; Denton, Jai A. ; Reed, Floyd A. / First steps towards underdominant genetic transformation of insect populations. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 5.
@article{8c3708e89f6647dfa959a5ffef456480,
title = "First steps towards underdominant genetic transformation of insect populations",
abstract = "The idea of introducing genetic modifications into wild populations of insects to stop them from spreading diseases is more than 40 years old. Synthetic disease refractory genes have been successfully generated for mosquito vectors of dengue fever and human malaria. Equally important is the development of population transformation systems to drive and maintain disease refractory genes at high frequency in populations. We demonstrate an underdominant population transformation system in Drosophila melanogaster that has the property of being both spatially self-limiting and reversible to the original genetic state. Both population transformation and its reversal can be largely achieved within as few as 5 generations. The described genetic construct {Ud} is composed of two genes; (1) a UAS-RpL14.dsRNA targeting RNAi to a haploinsufficient gene RpL14 and (2) an RNAi insensitive RpL14 rescue. In this proof-of-principle system the UAS-RpL14.dsRNA knock-down gene is placed under the control of an Actin5c-GAL4 driver located on a different chromosome to the {Ud} insert. This configuration would not be effective in wild populations without incorporating the Actin5c-GAL4 driver as part of the {Ud} construct (or replacing the UAS promoter with an appropriate direct promoter). It is however anticipated that the approach that underlies this underdominant system could potentially be applied to a number of species.",
author = "{Guy Reeves}, R. and Jarosław Bryk and Altrock, {Philipp M.} and Denton, {Jai A.} and Reed, {Floyd A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "5",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0097557",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "5",

}

First steps towards underdominant genetic transformation of insect populations. / Guy Reeves, R.; Bryk, Jarosław; Altrock, Philipp M.; Denton, Jai A.; Reed, Floyd A.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 5, e97557, 20.05.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - First steps towards underdominant genetic transformation of insect populations

AU - Guy Reeves, R.

AU - Bryk, Jarosław

AU - Altrock, Philipp M.

AU - Denton, Jai A.

AU - Reed, Floyd A.

PY - 2014/5/20

Y1 - 2014/5/20

N2 - The idea of introducing genetic modifications into wild populations of insects to stop them from spreading diseases is more than 40 years old. Synthetic disease refractory genes have been successfully generated for mosquito vectors of dengue fever and human malaria. Equally important is the development of population transformation systems to drive and maintain disease refractory genes at high frequency in populations. We demonstrate an underdominant population transformation system in Drosophila melanogaster that has the property of being both spatially self-limiting and reversible to the original genetic state. Both population transformation and its reversal can be largely achieved within as few as 5 generations. The described genetic construct {Ud} is composed of two genes; (1) a UAS-RpL14.dsRNA targeting RNAi to a haploinsufficient gene RpL14 and (2) an RNAi insensitive RpL14 rescue. In this proof-of-principle system the UAS-RpL14.dsRNA knock-down gene is placed under the control of an Actin5c-GAL4 driver located on a different chromosome to the {Ud} insert. This configuration would not be effective in wild populations without incorporating the Actin5c-GAL4 driver as part of the {Ud} construct (or replacing the UAS promoter with an appropriate direct promoter). It is however anticipated that the approach that underlies this underdominant system could potentially be applied to a number of species.

AB - The idea of introducing genetic modifications into wild populations of insects to stop them from spreading diseases is more than 40 years old. Synthetic disease refractory genes have been successfully generated for mosquito vectors of dengue fever and human malaria. Equally important is the development of population transformation systems to drive and maintain disease refractory genes at high frequency in populations. We demonstrate an underdominant population transformation system in Drosophila melanogaster that has the property of being both spatially self-limiting and reversible to the original genetic state. Both population transformation and its reversal can be largely achieved within as few as 5 generations. The described genetic construct {Ud} is composed of two genes; (1) a UAS-RpL14.dsRNA targeting RNAi to a haploinsufficient gene RpL14 and (2) an RNAi insensitive RpL14 rescue. In this proof-of-principle system the UAS-RpL14.dsRNA knock-down gene is placed under the control of an Actin5c-GAL4 driver located on a different chromosome to the {Ud} insert. This configuration would not be effective in wild populations without incorporating the Actin5c-GAL4 driver as part of the {Ud} construct (or replacing the UAS promoter with an appropriate direct promoter). It is however anticipated that the approach that underlies this underdominant system could potentially be applied to a number of species.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84901329144&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0097557

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0097557

M3 - Article

VL - 9

JO - PLoS One

T2 - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 5

M1 - e97557

ER -