FreeNRG: Notes from the Edge of the Dance Floor

Research output: Book/ReportBookpeer-review

Abstract

Published in 2001, FreeNRG is a classic collection of frontline communiques on technotribes, contemporary musical practices and events flourishing on the fringes of Australian dance culture throughout the nineties. The anthology's 13 essays were written by specialists of a spectrum of phenomena thriving at the edge of the dance floor.

Edited by Graham St John, the anthology introduced DiY culture, a networked movement committed to voluntarism, ecological sustainability, social justice and human rights. FreeNRG people participate in an economy of mutual-aid and co-operation, are committed to the non-commodification of art and embrace freedoms of experience and expression. Artists and activists, their cultural output combines pleasure and politics. Technicians and esotericists, they pirate technologies in the pursuit of re-enchantment and liberated space.

​Contents

Foreword by Ken Gelder
Introduction by Graham St John: Techno Inferno

​Part I Post Rave Australia

Doof! Australian Post Rave Culture, Graham St John.
Propagating Abominable Knowledge: Tekno Zine Culture, Kathleen Williamson.

Part II Sound Systems and Systems Sound

Sound Systems and Australian DiY Culture: Folk Music for the Dot Com Generation, Enda Murray. Doofstory: Sydney Park to the Desert, Peter Strong
Tuning Technology to Ecology: Labrats Sola Powered Sound System, Monkey Marc and Izzy Brown.
Techno Terra-ism: Feral Systems and Sound Futures, Graham St John.

Part III Techno-Ascension

Mutoid Waste Recycledelia and Earthdream, Robin Cooke.
Psychic Sonics: Tribadelic Dance Trance-formation, Eugene ENRG (DJ Krusty) interviews Ray Castle.
Chaos Engines: Doofs, Psychedelics and Religious Experience, Des Tramacchi.
Directions to the Game: Barrelfull of Monkeys, Rak Razam.

Part IV Reclaiming Space

​Practice Random Acts: Reclaiming the Streets of Australia, Susan Luckman.
Carnival at Crown Casino: S11as Party and Protest, Kurt Iveson and Sean Scalmer.
Appropriating the Means of Production: Dance Music Industries and Contested Digital Space, Chris Gibson.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAltona
PublisherCommon Ground Publishing
Number of pages381
ISBN (Print)1863350845, 9781863350846
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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