Growing spaces

an evaluation of the mental health recovery programme using mixed methods

Michelle Howarth, Michaela Rogers , Neil Withnell, Catherine McQuarrie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background
Therapeutic horticulture is a nature-based method that includes a range of green activities, such as gardening, to promote wellbeing. It is believed that therapeutic horticulture provides a person-centred approach that can reduce social isolation for people with mental health problems.

Aims
The aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of a mental health recovery programme that used therapeutic horticulture as an intervention to reduce social inclusion and improve engagement for people with mental health problems.

Methods
A mixed-methods approach was used and data from four semi-structured focus group interviews, 11 exit interviews and 20 ‘recovery star' datasets were collected from September 2015 to October 2017. Qualitative data from the interviews were thematically analysed, and quantitative data based on a recovery star outcomes tool were analysed using descriptive statistics to demonstrate trends and progression. The findings were then triangulated to provide a rich picture of the impact of the mental health recovery programme.

Results
The recovery star data indicated that participants were working towards self-reliance. Qualitative data from the exit interview and semi-structured focus groups found similar results. The triangulated findings highlight that the mental health recovery programme enabled participant integration into the community through providing a space to grow and build self-confidence while re-engaging with society. The results suggest that using therapeutic horticulture as an intervention within the mental health recovery programme can support people with mental health problems to re-engage socially. Nature-based activities could be used within the ‘social prescribing’ movement to encourage partnership working between the NHS and voluntary sector organisations which can complement existing mental health services.

Conclusion
The use of therapeutic horticulture as an intervention within a mental health recovery programme can support people with mental health problems to re-engage with the community and is integral to the rehabilitation process. The mental health recovery programme should be promoted within the social prescribing movement as an evidence-based opportunity to support people in the community.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)476-489
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Research in Nursing
Volume23
Issue number6
Early online date11 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Mental Health
Interviews
Focus Groups
Gardening
Social Isolation
Mental Health Services
Therapeutic Uses
Therapeutics
Rehabilitation
Organizations

Cite this

Howarth, Michelle ; Rogers , Michaela ; Withnell, Neil ; McQuarrie, Catherine. / Growing spaces : an evaluation of the mental health recovery programme using mixed methods. In: Journal of Research in Nursing. 2018 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 476-489.
@article{97435e41104f43b2b34cfcbac11c77b4,
title = "Growing spaces: an evaluation of the mental health recovery programme using mixed methods",
abstract = "BackgroundTherapeutic horticulture is a nature-based method that includes a range of green activities, such as gardening, to promote wellbeing. It is believed that therapeutic horticulture provides a person-centred approach that can reduce social isolation for people with mental health problems.AimsThe aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of a mental health recovery programme that used therapeutic horticulture as an intervention to reduce social inclusion and improve engagement for people with mental health problems.MethodsA mixed-methods approach was used and data from four semi-structured focus group interviews, 11 exit interviews and 20 ‘recovery star' datasets were collected from September 2015 to October 2017. Qualitative data from the interviews were thematically analysed, and quantitative data based on a recovery star outcomes tool were analysed using descriptive statistics to demonstrate trends and progression. The findings were then triangulated to provide a rich picture of the impact of the mental health recovery programme.ResultsThe recovery star data indicated that participants were working towards self-reliance. Qualitative data from the exit interview and semi-structured focus groups found similar results. The triangulated findings highlight that the mental health recovery programme enabled participant integration into the community through providing a space to grow and build self-confidence while re-engaging with society. The results suggest that using therapeutic horticulture as an intervention within the mental health recovery programme can support people with mental health problems to re-engage socially. Nature-based activities could be used within the ‘social prescribing’ movement to encourage partnership working between the NHS and voluntary sector organisations which can complement existing mental health services.ConclusionThe use of therapeutic horticulture as an intervention within a mental health recovery programme can support people with mental health problems to re-engage with the community and is integral to the rehabilitation process. The mental health recovery programme should be promoted within the social prescribing movement as an evidence-based opportunity to support people in the community.",
keywords = "Mental health, Nature, Therapeutic horticulture",
author = "Michelle Howarth and Michaela Rogers and Neil Withnell and Catherine McQuarrie",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1177/1744987118766207",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "476--489",
journal = "Journal of Research in Nursing",
issn = "1744-9871",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "6",

}

Growing spaces : an evaluation of the mental health recovery programme using mixed methods. / Howarth, Michelle; Rogers , Michaela ; Withnell, Neil; McQuarrie, Catherine.

In: Journal of Research in Nursing, Vol. 23, No. 6, 2018, p. 476-489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Growing spaces

T2 - an evaluation of the mental health recovery programme using mixed methods

AU - Howarth, Michelle

AU - Rogers , Michaela

AU - Withnell, Neil

AU - McQuarrie, Catherine

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - BackgroundTherapeutic horticulture is a nature-based method that includes a range of green activities, such as gardening, to promote wellbeing. It is believed that therapeutic horticulture provides a person-centred approach that can reduce social isolation for people with mental health problems.AimsThe aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of a mental health recovery programme that used therapeutic horticulture as an intervention to reduce social inclusion and improve engagement for people with mental health problems.MethodsA mixed-methods approach was used and data from four semi-structured focus group interviews, 11 exit interviews and 20 ‘recovery star' datasets were collected from September 2015 to October 2017. Qualitative data from the interviews were thematically analysed, and quantitative data based on a recovery star outcomes tool were analysed using descriptive statistics to demonstrate trends and progression. The findings were then triangulated to provide a rich picture of the impact of the mental health recovery programme.ResultsThe recovery star data indicated that participants were working towards self-reliance. Qualitative data from the exit interview and semi-structured focus groups found similar results. The triangulated findings highlight that the mental health recovery programme enabled participant integration into the community through providing a space to grow and build self-confidence while re-engaging with society. The results suggest that using therapeutic horticulture as an intervention within the mental health recovery programme can support people with mental health problems to re-engage socially. Nature-based activities could be used within the ‘social prescribing’ movement to encourage partnership working between the NHS and voluntary sector organisations which can complement existing mental health services.ConclusionThe use of therapeutic horticulture as an intervention within a mental health recovery programme can support people with mental health problems to re-engage with the community and is integral to the rehabilitation process. The mental health recovery programme should be promoted within the social prescribing movement as an evidence-based opportunity to support people in the community.

AB - BackgroundTherapeutic horticulture is a nature-based method that includes a range of green activities, such as gardening, to promote wellbeing. It is believed that therapeutic horticulture provides a person-centred approach that can reduce social isolation for people with mental health problems.AimsThe aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of a mental health recovery programme that used therapeutic horticulture as an intervention to reduce social inclusion and improve engagement for people with mental health problems.MethodsA mixed-methods approach was used and data from four semi-structured focus group interviews, 11 exit interviews and 20 ‘recovery star' datasets were collected from September 2015 to October 2017. Qualitative data from the interviews were thematically analysed, and quantitative data based on a recovery star outcomes tool were analysed using descriptive statistics to demonstrate trends and progression. The findings were then triangulated to provide a rich picture of the impact of the mental health recovery programme.ResultsThe recovery star data indicated that participants were working towards self-reliance. Qualitative data from the exit interview and semi-structured focus groups found similar results. The triangulated findings highlight that the mental health recovery programme enabled participant integration into the community through providing a space to grow and build self-confidence while re-engaging with society. The results suggest that using therapeutic horticulture as an intervention within the mental health recovery programme can support people with mental health problems to re-engage socially. Nature-based activities could be used within the ‘social prescribing’ movement to encourage partnership working between the NHS and voluntary sector organisations which can complement existing mental health services.ConclusionThe use of therapeutic horticulture as an intervention within a mental health recovery programme can support people with mental health problems to re-engage with the community and is integral to the rehabilitation process. The mental health recovery programme should be promoted within the social prescribing movement as an evidence-based opportunity to support people in the community.

KW - Mental health

KW - Nature

KW - Therapeutic horticulture

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050129991&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1744987118766207

DO - 10.1177/1744987118766207

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 476

EP - 489

JO - Journal of Research in Nursing

JF - Journal of Research in Nursing

SN - 1744-9871

IS - 6

ER -