Handling resource interfaces in a planned economy: how Tipografiya solves interaction issues without direct interaction

Martin Johanson, Alexandra Waluszewski

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The previous empirical pictures of how knowledge is embedded into resource interfaces can be characterised as “variations on a theme”. Although we saw different patterns surrounding the embedding of knowledge, the processes described in the three previous chapters have at least two general themes in common. First, they took place in an economic system where business actors are allowed to interact directly with counterparts on the supplier-customer side. Second, they occurred in business contexts where the actors are so aware of the need to interact with counterparts concerning related resource interfaces that this skill is taken for granted. Third, they illustrated that conscious handling of resource interfaces over company borders can create economic effects that are impossible to reach through the economic theory’s way of exchange, i.e. through competition among anonymous actors exchanging given resources.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationKnowledge and Innovation in Business and Industry
Subtitle of host publicationThe Importance of Using Others
EditorsHåkan Håkansson, Alexandra Waluszewski
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter5
Pages109-126
Number of pages18
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9780203947029
ISBN (Print)9780415541572, 9780415425292
Publication statusPublished - 14 May 2007
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameRoutledge Studies in Innovation, Organizations and Technology
PublisherRoutledge

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  • Cite this

    Johanson, M., & Waluszewski, A. (2007). Handling resource interfaces in a planned economy: how Tipografiya solves interaction issues without direct interaction. In H. Håkansson, & A. Waluszewski (Eds.), Knowledge and Innovation in Business and Industry: The Importance of Using Others (1st ed., pp. 109-126). (Routledge Studies in Innovation, Organizations and Technology). Routledge. https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9780203947029/chapters/10.4324/9780203947029-12