HE in FE

vocationalism, class and social justice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The paper draws on the Wolf (2015) report (Heading for the Precipice: Can Further and Higher Education Funding Policies Be Sustained?) and other quantitative data, specifically that derived from HEFCE’s Participation of Local Area (POLAR) classifications. In addition it explores key literature and debates that associate higher education in further education (HE in FE) with the pursuit of social justice. This enables an interrogation of conceptualisations of vocationalism as well as a consideration of its articulation with class and gender. Whilst the paper is set within a particular and English socio-economic context, it addresses issues that have a much broader global significance. The paper argues that whilst HE in FE has limited traction in facilitating social mobility it does serve as a resource in the struggle for social justice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-65
Number of pages17
JournalResearch in Post-Compulsory Education
Volume21
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Mar 2016

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class justice
further education
social justice
funding policy
education
Social Mobility
participation
gender
resources
economics

Cite this

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title = "HE in FE: vocationalism, class and social justice",
abstract = "The paper draws on the Wolf (2015) report (Heading for the Precipice: Can Further and Higher Education Funding Policies Be Sustained?) and other quantitative data, specifically that derived from HEFCE’s Participation of Local Area (POLAR) classifications. In addition it explores key literature and debates that associate higher education in further education (HE in FE) with the pursuit of social justice. This enables an interrogation of conceptualisations of vocationalism as well as a consideration of its articulation with class and gender. Whilst the paper is set within a particular and English socio-economic context, it addresses issues that have a much broader global significance. The paper argues that whilst HE in FE has limited traction in facilitating social mobility it does serve as a resource in the struggle for social justice.",
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HE in FE : vocationalism, class and social justice. / Avis, James; Orr, Kevin.

In: Research in Post-Compulsory Education, Vol. 21, No. 1-2, 03.03.2016, p. 49-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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