Healing Victorian Masculinities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While the New Man figures as a "failed experiment" (22) in the novels discussed in this chapter, MacDonald finds nonetheless an implicit acknowledgement of the need for change in the social forms of gender, in romantic relationships between men and women, and in the novel as a genre equipped to engage with the changes already underway in the late-Victorian period
LanguageEnglish
Pages198-206
Number of pages9
JournalPapers on Language and Literature
Volume52
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

masculinity
genre
experiment
gender
Masculinity
Healing
Victorian Era
Romantic Relationships
Victorian Period
Late-Victorian
Acknowledgement
Novel
Experiment

Cite this

@article{bf753267407b465f8dcb28f1057afaf8,
title = "Healing Victorian Masculinities",
abstract = "While the New Man figures as a {"}failed experiment{"} (22) in the novels discussed in this chapter, MacDonald finds nonetheless an implicit acknowledgement of the need for change in the social forms of gender, in romantic relationships between men and women, and in the novel as a genre equipped to engage with the changes already underway in the late-Victorian period",
keywords = "Literary History, Literature, Criticism, English literature, masculinities, Victorian Literature",
author = "Merrick Burrow",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "198--206",
journal = "Papers on Language and Literature",
issn = "0031-1294",
publisher = "Southern Illinois University Press",
number = "2",

}

Healing Victorian Masculinities. / Burrow, Merrick.

In: Papers on Language and Literature, Vol. 52, No. 2, 2016, p. 198-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Healing Victorian Masculinities

AU - Burrow, Merrick

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - While the New Man figures as a "failed experiment" (22) in the novels discussed in this chapter, MacDonald finds nonetheless an implicit acknowledgement of the need for change in the social forms of gender, in romantic relationships between men and women, and in the novel as a genre equipped to engage with the changes already underway in the late-Victorian period

AB - While the New Man figures as a "failed experiment" (22) in the novels discussed in this chapter, MacDonald finds nonetheless an implicit acknowledgement of the need for change in the social forms of gender, in romantic relationships between men and women, and in the novel as a genre equipped to engage with the changes already underway in the late-Victorian period

KW - Literary History

KW - Literature

KW - Criticism

KW - English literature

KW - masculinities

KW - Victorian Literature

UR - http://www.siue.edu/pll/

M3 - Article

VL - 52

SP - 198

EP - 206

JO - Papers on Language and Literature

T2 - Papers on Language and Literature

JF - Papers on Language and Literature

SN - 0031-1294

IS - 2

ER -