Health impacts of pedestrian head-loading: A review of the evidence with particular reference to women and children in sub-Saharan Africa

Gina Porter, Kate Hampshire, Christine Dunn, Richard Hall, Martin Levesley, Kim Burton, Steve Robson, Albert Abane, Mwenza Blell, Julia Panther

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Across sub-Saharan Africa, women and children play major roles as pedestrian load-transporters, in the widespread absence of basic sanitation services, electricity and affordable/reliable motorised transport. The majority of loads, including water and firewood for domestic purposes, are carried on the head. Load-carrying has implications not only for school attendance and performance, women's time budgets and gender relations, but arguably also for health and well-being. We report findings from a comprehensive review of relevant literature, undertaken June–September 2012, focussing particularly on biomechanics, maternal health, and the psycho-social impacts of load-carrying; we also draw from our own research. Key knowledge gaps and areas for future research are highlighted.
LanguageEnglish
Pages90-97
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume88
Early online date17 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

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Africa South of the Sahara
pedestrian
Head
time budget
Electricity
school attendance
Sanitation
knowledge gap
Health
gender relations
Budgets
Interpersonal Relations
Social Change
health
Biomechanical Phenomena
social effects
electricity
evidence
well-being
water

Cite this

Porter, Gina ; Hampshire, Kate ; Dunn, Christine ; Hall, Richard ; Levesley, Martin ; Burton, Kim ; Robson, Steve ; Abane, Albert ; Blell, Mwenza ; Panther, Julia. / Health impacts of pedestrian head-loading : A review of the evidence with particular reference to women and children in sub-Saharan Africa. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 88. pp. 90-97.
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Health impacts of pedestrian head-loading : A review of the evidence with particular reference to women and children in sub-Saharan Africa. / Porter, Gina; Hampshire, Kate; Dunn, Christine; Hall, Richard; Levesley, Martin; Burton, Kim; Robson, Steve; Abane, Albert; Blell, Mwenza; Panther, Julia.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 88, 07.2013, p. 90-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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