High Performance Management: A Literature Review

Learning as Work Research Paper, No. 1 June 2004

Peter Butler, Alan Felstead, David Ashton, Alison Fuller, Tracey Yeadon-Lee, Lorna Unwin, Sally Walters

Research output: Working paper

Abstract

In recent years there has been widespread discussion concerning the purported shift away from Taylorism towards a new production paradigm premised upon techniques of highperformance management (HPM). This paper argues that in seeking to capture the essence of the phenomenon
commentators typically privilege different aspects of the management function. For example, some emphasise the importance of task formulation while others focus heavily on the management of human resources. Drawing on recent work by Bélanger et al. (2002) it is argued that any construct needs to be to be understood as a composite covering three discrete but related spheres: production management, work organisation and employee relations. The paper then moves on to consider the principal theoretical debates surrounding the emergent model; namely, the compatibility of HPM with neoliberal orthodoxy; the impact of HPM on productivity; and, finally, the implications of HPM vis-à-vis employees. The paper concludes that there is a need for the development of more refined analytical tools and similarly the excavation of data more sensitive to potential sectoral dynamics.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherUniversity of Leicester
Number of pages36
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

Fingerprint

Performance management
High performance
Research work
Literature review
Paradigm
Taylorism
Production management
Human resources
Compatibility
Work organization
Orthodoxy
Employee relations
Employees
Productivity

Cite this

Butler, P., Felstead, A., Ashton, D., Fuller, A., Yeadon-Lee, T., Unwin, L., & Walters, S. (2004). High Performance Management: A Literature Review: Learning as Work Research Paper, No. 1 June 2004. University of Leicester.
Butler, Peter ; Felstead, Alan ; Ashton, David ; Fuller, Alison ; Yeadon-Lee, Tracey ; Unwin, Lorna ; Walters, Sally . / High Performance Management: A Literature Review : Learning as Work Research Paper, No. 1 June 2004. University of Leicester, 2004.
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Butler, P, Felstead, A, Ashton, D, Fuller, A, Yeadon-Lee, T, Unwin, L & Walters, S 2004 'High Performance Management: A Literature Review: Learning as Work Research Paper, No. 1 June 2004' University of Leicester.

High Performance Management: A Literature Review : Learning as Work Research Paper, No. 1 June 2004. / Butler, Peter ; Felstead, Alan; Ashton, David; Fuller, Alison ; Yeadon-Lee, Tracey; Unwin, Lorna; Walters, Sally .

University of Leicester, 2004.

Research output: Working paper

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Butler P, Felstead A, Ashton D, Fuller A, Yeadon-Lee T, Unwin L et al. High Performance Management: A Literature Review: Learning as Work Research Paper, No. 1 June 2004. University of Leicester. 2004 Jun.