High speed DSC (hyper-DSC) as a tool to measure the solubility of a drug within a solid or semi-solid matrix

Daniela Gramaglia, Barbara R. Conway, Vicky L. Kett, R. Karl Malcolm, Hannah K. Batchelor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques are commonly used to quantify the solubility of drugs within polymeric-controlled delivery systems. However, the nature of the DSC experiment, and in particular the relatively slow heating rates employed, limit its use to the measurement of drug solubility at the drug's melting temperature. Here, we describe the application of hyper-DSC (HDSC), a variant of DSC involving extremely rapid heating rates, to the calculation of the solubility of a model drug, metronidazole, in silicone elastomer, and demonstrate that the faster heating rates permit the solubility to be calculated under non-equilibrium conditions such that the solubility better approximates that at the temperature of use. At a heating rate of 400°C/min (HDSC), metronidazole solubility was calculated to be 2.16 mg/g compared with 6.16 mg/g at 20°C/min.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmaceutics
Volume301
Issue number1-2
Early online date2 Aug 2005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Differential Scanning Calorimetry
Solubility
Heating
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Metronidazole
Silicone Elastomers
Temperature
Freezing

Cite this

Gramaglia, Daniela ; Conway, Barbara R. ; Kett, Vicky L. ; Malcolm, R. Karl ; Batchelor, Hannah K. / High speed DSC (hyper-DSC) as a tool to measure the solubility of a drug within a solid or semi-solid matrix. In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics. 2005 ; Vol. 301, No. 1-2. pp. 1-5.
@article{edecb2d4a4c74003809e29adbd378596,
title = "High speed DSC (hyper-DSC) as a tool to measure the solubility of a drug within a solid or semi-solid matrix",
abstract = "Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques are commonly used to quantify the solubility of drugs within polymeric-controlled delivery systems. However, the nature of the DSC experiment, and in particular the relatively slow heating rates employed, limit its use to the measurement of drug solubility at the drug's melting temperature. Here, we describe the application of hyper-DSC (HDSC), a variant of DSC involving extremely rapid heating rates, to the calculation of the solubility of a model drug, metronidazole, in silicone elastomer, and demonstrate that the faster heating rates permit the solubility to be calculated under non-equilibrium conditions such that the solubility better approximates that at the temperature of use. At a heating rate of 400°C/min (HDSC), metronidazole solubility was calculated to be 2.16 mg/g compared with 6.16 mg/g at 20°C/min.",
keywords = "High-speed DSC, Metronidazole, Silicone, Solubility",
author = "Daniela Gramaglia and Conway, {Barbara R.} and Kett, {Vicky L.} and Malcolm, {R. Karl} and Batchelor, {Hannah K.}",
year = "2005",
month = "9",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijpharm.2005.04.038",
language = "English",
volume = "301",
pages = "1--5",
journal = "International Journal of Pharmaceutics",
issn = "0378-5173",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-2",

}

High speed DSC (hyper-DSC) as a tool to measure the solubility of a drug within a solid or semi-solid matrix. / Gramaglia, Daniela; Conway, Barbara R.; Kett, Vicky L.; Malcolm, R. Karl; Batchelor, Hannah K.

In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Vol. 301, No. 1-2, 14.09.2005, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - High speed DSC (hyper-DSC) as a tool to measure the solubility of a drug within a solid or semi-solid matrix

AU - Gramaglia, Daniela

AU - Conway, Barbara R.

AU - Kett, Vicky L.

AU - Malcolm, R. Karl

AU - Batchelor, Hannah K.

PY - 2005/9/14

Y1 - 2005/9/14

N2 - Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques are commonly used to quantify the solubility of drugs within polymeric-controlled delivery systems. However, the nature of the DSC experiment, and in particular the relatively slow heating rates employed, limit its use to the measurement of drug solubility at the drug's melting temperature. Here, we describe the application of hyper-DSC (HDSC), a variant of DSC involving extremely rapid heating rates, to the calculation of the solubility of a model drug, metronidazole, in silicone elastomer, and demonstrate that the faster heating rates permit the solubility to be calculated under non-equilibrium conditions such that the solubility better approximates that at the temperature of use. At a heating rate of 400°C/min (HDSC), metronidazole solubility was calculated to be 2.16 mg/g compared with 6.16 mg/g at 20°C/min.

AB - Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques are commonly used to quantify the solubility of drugs within polymeric-controlled delivery systems. However, the nature of the DSC experiment, and in particular the relatively slow heating rates employed, limit its use to the measurement of drug solubility at the drug's melting temperature. Here, we describe the application of hyper-DSC (HDSC), a variant of DSC involving extremely rapid heating rates, to the calculation of the solubility of a model drug, metronidazole, in silicone elastomer, and demonstrate that the faster heating rates permit the solubility to be calculated under non-equilibrium conditions such that the solubility better approximates that at the temperature of use. At a heating rate of 400°C/min (HDSC), metronidazole solubility was calculated to be 2.16 mg/g compared with 6.16 mg/g at 20°C/min.

KW - High-speed DSC

KW - Metronidazole

KW - Silicone

KW - Solubility

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23944515791&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2005.04.038

DO - 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2005.04.038

M3 - Article

VL - 301

SP - 1

EP - 5

JO - International Journal of Pharmaceutics

JF - International Journal of Pharmaceutics

SN - 0378-5173

IS - 1-2

ER -