High temperature ceramics for use in membrane reactors: The development of microporosity during the pyrolysis of polycarbosilanes

Howard M. Williams, Elizabeth A. Dawson, Philip A. Barnes, Brian Rand, Rik M.D. Brydson, Adrian R. Brough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pyrolysis of polycarbosilane (PCS), a ceramic precursor polymer, at temperatures up to 700 °C under an inert atmosphere results in the development of amorphous microporous materials which have a number of potential applications, such as gas separation membranes. This paper investigates the development of microporosity during pyrolysis under nitrogen, at temperatures ranging from 300 to 700 °C, of both the cross-linked and non-cross-linked starting materials. The products are characterised by nitrogen adsorption, to determine surface areas and pore volumes, solid-state NMR, electron microscopy and FTIR, and their formation is studied using thermal analysis and evolved gas analysis with on-line mass spectrometry. The cross-linked and non-cross-linked PCSs have a maximum micropore volume of 0.2 cm3 g-1 at pyrolysis temperatures of between 550 and 600 °C. The microporosity is stable in air at room temperature, but is lost in oxidising atmospheres at elevated temperatures.

LanguageEnglish
Pages3754-3760
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Materials Chemistry
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Oct 2002

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Microporosity
Pyrolysis
Membranes
Nitrogen
Temperature
Microporous materials
Gas fuel analysis
Thermoanalysis
Electron microscopy
Mass spectrometry
Polymers
Gases
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Adsorption
Air

Cite this

Williams, Howard M. ; Dawson, Elizabeth A. ; Barnes, Philip A. ; Rand, Brian ; Brydson, Rik M.D. ; Brough, Adrian R. / High temperature ceramics for use in membrane reactors : The development of microporosity during the pyrolysis of polycarbosilanes. In: Journal of Materials Chemistry. 2002 ; Vol. 12, No. 12. pp. 3754-3760.
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High temperature ceramics for use in membrane reactors : The development of microporosity during the pyrolysis of polycarbosilanes. / Williams, Howard M.; Dawson, Elizabeth A.; Barnes, Philip A.; Rand, Brian; Brydson, Rik M.D.; Brough, Adrian R.

In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, Vol. 12, No. 12, 10.10.2002, p. 3754-3760.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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