High temperature ceramics for use in membrane reactors

The development of microporosity during the pyrolysis of polycarbosilanes

Howard M. Williams, Elizabeth A. Dawson, Philip A. Barnes, Brian Rand, Rik M.D. Brydson, Adrian R. Brough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pyrolysis of polycarbosilane (PCS), a ceramic precursor polymer, at temperatures up to 700 °C under an inert atmosphere results in the development of amorphous microporous materials which have a number of potential applications, such as gas separation membranes. This paper investigates the development of microporosity during pyrolysis under nitrogen, at temperatures ranging from 300 to 700 °C, of both the cross-linked and non-cross-linked starting materials. The products are characterised by nitrogen adsorption, to determine surface areas and pore volumes, solid-state NMR, electron microscopy and FTIR, and their formation is studied using thermal analysis and evolved gas analysis with on-line mass spectrometry. The cross-linked and non-cross-linked PCSs have a maximum micropore volume of 0.2 cm3 g-1 at pyrolysis temperatures of between 550 and 600 °C. The microporosity is stable in air at room temperature, but is lost in oxidising atmospheres at elevated temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3754-3760
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Materials Chemistry
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Oct 2002

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Microporosity
Pyrolysis
Membranes
Nitrogen
Temperature
Microporous materials
Gas fuel analysis
Thermoanalysis
Electron microscopy
Mass spectrometry
Polymers
Gases
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Adsorption
Air

Cite this

Williams, Howard M. ; Dawson, Elizabeth A. ; Barnes, Philip A. ; Rand, Brian ; Brydson, Rik M.D. ; Brough, Adrian R. / High temperature ceramics for use in membrane reactors : The development of microporosity during the pyrolysis of polycarbosilanes. In: Journal of Materials Chemistry. 2002 ; Vol. 12, No. 12. pp. 3754-3760.
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High temperature ceramics for use in membrane reactors : The development of microporosity during the pyrolysis of polycarbosilanes. / Williams, Howard M.; Dawson, Elizabeth A.; Barnes, Philip A.; Rand, Brian; Brydson, Rik M.D.; Brough, Adrian R.

In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, Vol. 12, No. 12, 10.10.2002, p. 3754-3760.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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