How Firm-Specific Characteristics Shape Prospective Knowledge-Intensive Alliances in a Large Emerging Economy

Claudio De Mattos, Adam Cross

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

One of the main challenges to global development today is the challenge of inclusion; that is, to promote ‘equitable access to the benefits of development regardless of nationality, gender, or race’ (Wolfensohn, 1997). Though not without its detractors, modem biotechnology, in particular technology associated with genetic engineering, offers solutions to many of the major developmental problems facing humanity today, especially those relating to malnutrition, disease and pollution. Recent advances in biotechnology may also help to solve the conundrum of how to promote sustainable development in the face of natural ambitions for improved national and global economic growth and prosperity (EU White Paper, 1994). But the global biotechnology market is fragmented; the greatest technological advances take place in just a few developed countries (Shan and Song, 1997), whereas humanity’s major developmental problems are concentrated mainly in the less-developed economies. Mechanisms are needed so that appropriate biotechnologies created and refined in the ‘north’ (developed countries) are transferred efficiently and effectively to the ‘south’ (developing countries) in some mutually beneficial way.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternationalization
Subtitle of host publicationFirm Strategies and Management
EditorsColin Wheeler, Frank McDonald, Irene Greaves
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan Ltd.
Pages120-137
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9780230514638
ISBN (Print)9781403906717, 9781349510221
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameThe Academy of International Business
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan

Fingerprint

Alliances
Biotechnology
Firm-specific characteristics
Emerging economies
Developed countries
Technological advances
Sustainable development
Pollution
Inclusion
Nationality
Malnutrition
Economic growth
Genetic engineering
Developing countries
Prosperity

Cite this

De Mattos, C., & Cross, A. (2003). How Firm-Specific Characteristics Shape Prospective Knowledge-Intensive Alliances in a Large Emerging Economy. In C. Wheeler, F. McDonald, & I. Greaves (Eds.), Internationalization: Firm Strategies and Management (pp. 120-137). (The Academy of International Business). Palgrave Macmillan Ltd.. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230514638_8
De Mattos, Claudio ; Cross, Adam. / How Firm-Specific Characteristics Shape Prospective Knowledge-Intensive Alliances in a Large Emerging Economy. Internationalization: Firm Strategies and Management. editor / Colin Wheeler ; Frank McDonald ; Irene Greaves. Palgrave Macmillan Ltd., 2003. pp. 120-137 (The Academy of International Business).
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De Mattos, C & Cross, A 2003, How Firm-Specific Characteristics Shape Prospective Knowledge-Intensive Alliances in a Large Emerging Economy. in C Wheeler, F McDonald & I Greaves (eds), Internationalization: Firm Strategies and Management. The Academy of International Business, Palgrave Macmillan Ltd., pp. 120-137. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230514638_8

How Firm-Specific Characteristics Shape Prospective Knowledge-Intensive Alliances in a Large Emerging Economy. / De Mattos, Claudio; Cross, Adam.

Internationalization: Firm Strategies and Management. ed. / Colin Wheeler; Frank McDonald; Irene Greaves. Palgrave Macmillan Ltd., 2003. p. 120-137 (The Academy of International Business).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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De Mattos C, Cross A. How Firm-Specific Characteristics Shape Prospective Knowledge-Intensive Alliances in a Large Emerging Economy. In Wheeler C, McDonald F, Greaves I, editors, Internationalization: Firm Strategies and Management. Palgrave Macmillan Ltd. 2003. p. 120-137. (The Academy of International Business). https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230514638_8