How shall we know them? Trainee teachers' perceptions of their learners' abilities

Ian Rushton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article, being the final one in a series of three for this journal, is concerned with trainee teachers' changing perceptions of their learners and focuses on two areas: trainees' perceptions of their learners' abilities and how they are formed by their own experiences as learners; and the changes in trainees' perceptions over the duration of their two year Initial Teacher Education (ITE) course in the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS). Working within a multi-method approach to action research, this small-scale study found that trainees' perceptions were influenced not so much by their own identities and habitus, although social capital was a prominent feature, but by a problematic mix of competing cultures and the impact of casualisation in the sector.
LanguageEnglish
Pages16-28
Number of pages13
JournalTeaching in Lifelong Learning: a journal to inform and improve practice
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2011

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How shall we know them? Trainee teachers' perceptions of their learners' abilities. / Rushton, Ian.

In: Teaching in Lifelong Learning: a journal to inform and improve practice, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.05.2011, p. 16-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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