“I just felt as though I had to drop something”: The implications of care for female working elder carers’ working lives

Vivien Burr, Helen Colley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper explores the challenges that female elder carers in the United Kingdom face in combining paid work with elder care, and the implications of this care for their current and future working lives. In-depth interviews with 11 working women from a large organisation were conducted, and five of the women were re-interviewed after a period of one year to examine any changes in their situation. The interviews revealed the precarious nature of their daily schedules, which required constant effort to maintain, the intrusion of elder care into their working lives, and the impact it had upon their career development and future aspirations. The findings provide insight into the reasons why carers, especially women, are more likely to reduce their working hours, do not take advantage of training opportunities and retire early. The findings are discussed in relation to the expectation of an extended working age and gender equality.

LanguageEnglish
Pages877-898
Number of pages22
JournalAgeing and Society
Volume39
Issue number5
Early online date27 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

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working life
Caregivers
Interviews
Working Women
training opportunities
Appointments and Schedules
working hours
working woman
interview
equality
career
gender
Elders
Carers
Elder Care
United Kingdom

Cite this

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“I just felt as though I had to drop something” : The implications of care for female working elder carers’ working lives. / Burr, Vivien; Colley, Helen.

In: Ageing and Society, Vol. 39, No. 5, 01.05.2019, p. 877-898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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