Identity Formation in Ritual Interaction

Dániel Z. Kádár

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the (co-)construction of identities in ritual interaction, by focusing on the choice of interactional styles. 'Interactional style' describes a cluster of similar indexical actions within the interaction "frame" (Goffman, 1974) of a ritual. Ritual is a recurrent interaction type, which puts constraints on the individual's "freedom" to construct their (and others') identities, in a somewhat similar way to institutional interactions, which have been broadly studied in the field. However, the constraints posed by ritual interactions are different from institutional, and so by examining identity (co-)construction via interactional style choices in ritual contexts, this paper fills an important knowledge gap. I approach interactional style choices through the notions of "role" and "accountability", and by placing ritual practices within Goffman's (1981) participation framework. I use examples of heckling at performing arts events as data. By focusing on interactional style, the paper contributes to the present Special Issue dedicated to interactional styles across cultures.

LanguageEnglish
Pages278-307
Number of pages30
JournalInternational Review of Pragmatics
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

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identity formation
religious behavior
interaction
knowledge gap
Identity Formation
Interaction Rituals
Interaction
art
responsibility
participation
event
present

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Kádár, Dániel Z. / Identity Formation in Ritual Interaction. In: International Review of Pragmatics. 2015 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 278-307.
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Identity Formation in Ritual Interaction. / Kádár, Dániel Z.

In: International Review of Pragmatics, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 278-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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