1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The explanations to date of the remarkable decrease in crime that has been reported over the last two decades in a number of western countries have been less than convincing. In light of these limitations this article explores the impact that the recent increase of immigration into the UK may have had on recorded crime levels. Drawing on a range of international research the paper includes some empirical evidence from England and Wales that suggests that in contrast to the popular opinion that increased immigration is associated with an increase in crime, that not only are the recent waves of immigration not linked to rising crime, but also our findings lend qualified support to the contention that recent waves of immigration have contributed to the crime drop that has taken place in the UK and other countries over the last two decades.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-229
Number of pages25
JournalEuropean Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 2017

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title = "Immigration and the Crime Drop",
abstract = "The explanations to date of the remarkable decrease in crime that has been reported over the last two decades in a number of western countries have been less than convincing. In light of these limitations this article explores the impact that the recent increase of immigration into the UK may have had on recorded crime levels. Drawing on a range of international research the paper includes some empirical evidence from England and Wales that suggests that in contrast to the popular opinion that increased immigration is associated with an increase in crime, that not only are the recent waves of immigration not linked to rising crime, but also our findings lend qualified support to the contention that recent waves of immigration have contributed to the crime drop that has taken place in the UK and other countries over the last two decades.",
keywords = "Victimisation, Crime drop, Violence, Immigration, Crime",
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Immigration and the Crime Drop. / Ignatans, Dainis; Matthews, Roger.

In: European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, Vol. 25, No. 3, 20.07.2017, p. 205-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The explanations to date of the remarkable decrease in crime that has been reported over the last two decades in a number of western countries have been less than convincing. In light of these limitations this article explores the impact that the recent increase of immigration into the UK may have had on recorded crime levels. Drawing on a range of international research the paper includes some empirical evidence from England and Wales that suggests that in contrast to the popular opinion that increased immigration is associated with an increase in crime, that not only are the recent waves of immigration not linked to rising crime, but also our findings lend qualified support to the contention that recent waves of immigration have contributed to the crime drop that has taken place in the UK and other countries over the last two decades.

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