Impact of pharmacists' intervention on identification and management of drug-drug interactions in an intensive care setting

Syed Shahzad Hasan, Kim Nai Lim, Mudassir Anwar, Belagodu Sridha Sathvik, Keivan Ahmadi, Adelyn Wei Li Yuan, Mokhtar Ahmad Kamarunnesa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The primary and secondary objectives of this study were to identify and assess the risks associated with the occurrence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and to determine the value of pharmacists' interventions in the management of clinically significant DDIs, respectively. Methods: A prospective, case-control study was carried out on patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), and involved a review of patients' medication chart daily by the pharmacist and the clinical parameters. All identified DDIs were carefully analysed in order to provide recommendations on the management of clinically significant DDIs. Results: The majority of DDIs were categorised as Type-C severity level (n = 305, 75.9%). 'Substitution' was recommended in 34 cases of clinically significant DDIs, 'dosage adjustment' in 17 (4.2%) and 'stop or avoid' in 13 (3.2%). The number of drugs prescribed (p = 0.001, rS = 0.539) and length of ICU stay (p = 0.001, rS = 0.364) were significantly associated and positively correlated with the occurrence of DDIs. Patients with DDIs had a longer length of ICU stay than those without DDIs (9.5 days vs. 2.4 days, p = 0.001). No significant difference was found between patients aged below 50 years and those above 50 years (odds ratio 0.488, 95% confidence interval 0.166-1.434) in terms of the risk of DDIs. Conclusion: A large number of DDIs were identified in this study, but only a small number were clinically significant. Pharmacists' participation in daily ward rounds could play an important role in the detection and management of clinically significant DDIs.

LanguageEnglish
Pages526-531
Number of pages6
JournalSingapore Medical Journal
Volume53
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Critical Care
Drug Interactions
Pharmacists
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Intensive Care Units
Case-Control Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

Cite this

Hasan, S. S., Lim, K. N., Anwar, M., Sathvik, B. S., Ahmadi, K., Yuan, A. W. L., & Kamarunnesa, M. A. (2012). Impact of pharmacists' intervention on identification and management of drug-drug interactions in an intensive care setting. Singapore Medical Journal, 53(8), 526-531.
Hasan, Syed Shahzad ; Lim, Kim Nai ; Anwar, Mudassir ; Sathvik, Belagodu Sridha ; Ahmadi, Keivan ; Yuan, Adelyn Wei Li ; Kamarunnesa, Mokhtar Ahmad. / Impact of pharmacists' intervention on identification and management of drug-drug interactions in an intensive care setting. In: Singapore Medical Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 53, No. 8. pp. 526-531.
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Hasan, SS, Lim, KN, Anwar, M, Sathvik, BS, Ahmadi, K, Yuan, AWL & Kamarunnesa, MA 2012, 'Impact of pharmacists' intervention on identification and management of drug-drug interactions in an intensive care setting', Singapore Medical Journal, vol. 53, no. 8, pp. 526-531.

Impact of pharmacists' intervention on identification and management of drug-drug interactions in an intensive care setting. / Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Lim, Kim Nai; Anwar, Mudassir; Sathvik, Belagodu Sridha; Ahmadi, Keivan; Yuan, Adelyn Wei Li; Kamarunnesa, Mokhtar Ahmad.

In: Singapore Medical Journal, Vol. 53, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 526-531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Impact of pharmacists' intervention on identification and management of drug-drug interactions in an intensive care setting

AU - Hasan, Syed Shahzad

AU - Lim, Kim Nai

AU - Anwar, Mudassir

AU - Sathvik, Belagodu Sridha

AU - Ahmadi, Keivan

AU - Yuan, Adelyn Wei Li

AU - Kamarunnesa, Mokhtar Ahmad

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N2 - Introduction: The primary and secondary objectives of this study were to identify and assess the risks associated with the occurrence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and to determine the value of pharmacists' interventions in the management of clinically significant DDIs, respectively. Methods: A prospective, case-control study was carried out on patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), and involved a review of patients' medication chart daily by the pharmacist and the clinical parameters. All identified DDIs were carefully analysed in order to provide recommendations on the management of clinically significant DDIs. Results: The majority of DDIs were categorised as Type-C severity level (n = 305, 75.9%). 'Substitution' was recommended in 34 cases of clinically significant DDIs, 'dosage adjustment' in 17 (4.2%) and 'stop or avoid' in 13 (3.2%). The number of drugs prescribed (p = 0.001, rS = 0.539) and length of ICU stay (p = 0.001, rS = 0.364) were significantly associated and positively correlated with the occurrence of DDIs. Patients with DDIs had a longer length of ICU stay than those without DDIs (9.5 days vs. 2.4 days, p = 0.001). No significant difference was found between patients aged below 50 years and those above 50 years (odds ratio 0.488, 95% confidence interval 0.166-1.434) in terms of the risk of DDIs. Conclusion: A large number of DDIs were identified in this study, but only a small number were clinically significant. Pharmacists' participation in daily ward rounds could play an important role in the detection and management of clinically significant DDIs.

AB - Introduction: The primary and secondary objectives of this study were to identify and assess the risks associated with the occurrence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and to determine the value of pharmacists' interventions in the management of clinically significant DDIs, respectively. Methods: A prospective, case-control study was carried out on patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), and involved a review of patients' medication chart daily by the pharmacist and the clinical parameters. All identified DDIs were carefully analysed in order to provide recommendations on the management of clinically significant DDIs. Results: The majority of DDIs were categorised as Type-C severity level (n = 305, 75.9%). 'Substitution' was recommended in 34 cases of clinically significant DDIs, 'dosage adjustment' in 17 (4.2%) and 'stop or avoid' in 13 (3.2%). The number of drugs prescribed (p = 0.001, rS = 0.539) and length of ICU stay (p = 0.001, rS = 0.364) were significantly associated and positively correlated with the occurrence of DDIs. Patients with DDIs had a longer length of ICU stay than those without DDIs (9.5 days vs. 2.4 days, p = 0.001). No significant difference was found between patients aged below 50 years and those above 50 years (odds ratio 0.488, 95% confidence interval 0.166-1.434) in terms of the risk of DDIs. Conclusion: A large number of DDIs were identified in this study, but only a small number were clinically significant. Pharmacists' participation in daily ward rounds could play an important role in the detection and management of clinically significant DDIs.

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KW - Identification

KW - Intensive care

KW - Management

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