Improving Transparency in Construction Management

A Visual Planning and Control Model

Denise Brady, Patricia Tzortzopoulos, John Rooke, Carlos Torres Formoso, Algan Tezel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose:
The purpose of the paper is to discuss a production planning and control model known as the Lean Construction Management (LCM) model, which applies a number of visual tools in a systematic way to the planning and control process. The application of the visual tools in this way, facilitates the flow of information, thus improving transparency between the interfaces of planning, execution and control.

Design/Methodology/Approach:
Design Science research is adopted for this investigation, which analyses the original development of the model and reports on its testing and refinement over different types of projects. The research is divided into 3 parts, each part focusing on a different stage of development and construction project type.

Findings:
The main findings are related to the benefits of visual management in the construction planning and control process, such as maintaining consistency between different planning levels, so that feasible execution plans are created; control becomes more focused on prevention rather than correction, and creates opportunities for collaborative problem solving. Moreover, the physical display of the visual tools in a discrete planning area on-site encourages a regular exchange between participants on actual work progress as it unfolds, leading to more timely reaction to the problems at hand.

Originality/Value:
The problem of a lack of transparency in construction planning and control leads to communication issues on site, poor process orientation and high levels of waste. LCM improves process transparency by making information related to system wide processes more readily available to project participants. This enables them to foresee problems in a timely manner and to take necessary measures to resolve them or to adapt the process to current circumstances. The LCM model proposes a new way of applying visual tools and controls systematically to improve transparency in construction planning and control.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1277-1297
Number of pages21
JournalEngineering, Construction and Architectural Management
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Transparency
Planning
Construction management
Planning and control
Display devices
Construction planning
Lean construction
Communication
Testing
Management model
Planning process

Cite this

@article{54982ae7b7334ceabbc64fe7a0471468,
title = "Improving Transparency in Construction Management: A Visual Planning and Control Model",
abstract = "Purpose:The purpose of the paper is to discuss a production planning and control model known as the Lean Construction Management (LCM) model, which applies a number of visual tools in a systematic way to the planning and control process. The application of the visual tools in this way, facilitates the flow of information, thus improving transparency between the interfaces of planning, execution and control.Design/Methodology/Approach:Design Science research is adopted for this investigation, which analyses the original development of the model and reports on its testing and refinement over different types of projects. The research is divided into 3 parts, each part focusing on a different stage of development and construction project type.Findings:The main findings are related to the benefits of visual management in the construction planning and control process, such as maintaining consistency between different planning levels, so that feasible execution plans are created; control becomes more focused on prevention rather than correction, and creates opportunities for collaborative problem solving. Moreover, the physical display of the visual tools in a discrete planning area on-site encourages a regular exchange between participants on actual work progress as it unfolds, leading to more timely reaction to the problems at hand.Originality/Value:The problem of a lack of transparency in construction planning and control leads to communication issues on site, poor process orientation and high levels of waste. LCM improves process transparency by making information related to system wide processes more readily available to project participants. This enables them to foresee problems in a timely manner and to take necessary measures to resolve them or to adapt the process to current circumstances. The LCM model proposes a new way of applying visual tools and controls systematically to improve transparency in construction planning and control.",
keywords = "Transparency, Visual management, Challenges in planning and control, Lean construction",
author = "Denise Brady and Patricia Tzortzopoulos and John Rooke and Formoso, {Carlos Torres} and Algan Tezel",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0122",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "1277--1297",
journal = "Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management",
issn = "0969-9988",
publisher = "MCB UP Ltd",
number = "10",

}

Improving Transparency in Construction Management : A Visual Planning and Control Model. / Brady, Denise; Tzortzopoulos, Patricia; Rooke, John; Formoso, Carlos Torres; Tezel, Algan.

In: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Vol. 25, No. 10, 19.11.2018, p. 1277-1297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving Transparency in Construction Management

T2 - A Visual Planning and Control Model

AU - Brady, Denise

AU - Tzortzopoulos, Patricia

AU - Rooke, John

AU - Formoso, Carlos Torres

AU - Tezel, Algan

PY - 2018/11/19

Y1 - 2018/11/19

N2 - Purpose:The purpose of the paper is to discuss a production planning and control model known as the Lean Construction Management (LCM) model, which applies a number of visual tools in a systematic way to the planning and control process. The application of the visual tools in this way, facilitates the flow of information, thus improving transparency between the interfaces of planning, execution and control.Design/Methodology/Approach:Design Science research is adopted for this investigation, which analyses the original development of the model and reports on its testing and refinement over different types of projects. The research is divided into 3 parts, each part focusing on a different stage of development and construction project type.Findings:The main findings are related to the benefits of visual management in the construction planning and control process, such as maintaining consistency between different planning levels, so that feasible execution plans are created; control becomes more focused on prevention rather than correction, and creates opportunities for collaborative problem solving. Moreover, the physical display of the visual tools in a discrete planning area on-site encourages a regular exchange between participants on actual work progress as it unfolds, leading to more timely reaction to the problems at hand.Originality/Value:The problem of a lack of transparency in construction planning and control leads to communication issues on site, poor process orientation and high levels of waste. LCM improves process transparency by making information related to system wide processes more readily available to project participants. This enables them to foresee problems in a timely manner and to take necessary measures to resolve them or to adapt the process to current circumstances. The LCM model proposes a new way of applying visual tools and controls systematically to improve transparency in construction planning and control.

AB - Purpose:The purpose of the paper is to discuss a production planning and control model known as the Lean Construction Management (LCM) model, which applies a number of visual tools in a systematic way to the planning and control process. The application of the visual tools in this way, facilitates the flow of information, thus improving transparency between the interfaces of planning, execution and control.Design/Methodology/Approach:Design Science research is adopted for this investigation, which analyses the original development of the model and reports on its testing and refinement over different types of projects. The research is divided into 3 parts, each part focusing on a different stage of development and construction project type.Findings:The main findings are related to the benefits of visual management in the construction planning and control process, such as maintaining consistency between different planning levels, so that feasible execution plans are created; control becomes more focused on prevention rather than correction, and creates opportunities for collaborative problem solving. Moreover, the physical display of the visual tools in a discrete planning area on-site encourages a regular exchange between participants on actual work progress as it unfolds, leading to more timely reaction to the problems at hand.Originality/Value:The problem of a lack of transparency in construction planning and control leads to communication issues on site, poor process orientation and high levels of waste. LCM improves process transparency by making information related to system wide processes more readily available to project participants. This enables them to foresee problems in a timely manner and to take necessary measures to resolve them or to adapt the process to current circumstances. The LCM model proposes a new way of applying visual tools and controls systematically to improve transparency in construction planning and control.

KW - Transparency

KW - Visual management

KW - Challenges in planning and control

KW - Lean construction

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052588101&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0122

DO - 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0122

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 1277

EP - 1297

JO - Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management

JF - Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management

SN - 0969-9988

IS - 10

ER -