In, out and after care

Young adults' views on their lives, as children, in a therapeutic residential establishment

Bernard Gallagher, Adam Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children who have been severely maltreated may be placed in therapeutic children's homes (also known as residential treatment centres) in order that their often acute emotional and behavioural needs can be addressed. There is little data on process within these settings, especially outside the US. This article contains findings from interviews carried out with 16 young adults who had been placed in a therapeutic children's home in England. These former residents were asked for their views concerning the care they had received. The respondents were, in general, positive about their experiences, particularly in terms of their relationships with staff, life story work, leisure activities and the contact they had with staff after leaving the homes. Some of them were also happy with their experiences in relation to therapy, school, friendships and preparations for leaving the placement but others were less contented in these respects. The evidence from this research is that this highly disadvantaged group of children can be provided with a good quality of care within therapeutic children's homes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-450
Number of pages14
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume34
Issue number2
Early online date7 Dec 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

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young adult
Young Adult
staff
children's home
Residential Treatment
Therapeutics
friendship
Quality of Health Care
Leisure Activities
Vulnerable Populations
experience
England
contact
resident
Interviews
interview
school
evidence
Research
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Cite this

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