Introduction: Politics, identity and change in contemporary loyalism

Graham Spencer, James W. McAuley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Enter any mainstream bookshop in Northern Ireland and the image of loyalism that confronts the browser is ostensibly one of criminality and individualism. Publishers of books on loyalism seem to take particular interest in acts of violence and murder perpetrated by those who gain reputations not so much for their thinking, but for their actions. Accounts of this behaviour, through dramatic emphasis on menace and brutality, mean such books tend to sit better on the shelves of crime fiction, rather than politics or social history.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUlster Loyalism after the Good Friday Agreement
Subtitle of host publicationHistory, Identity and Change
EditorsJames W. McAuley, Graham Spencer
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages1-7
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9780230305830
ISBN (Print)9780230228856
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2011

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politics
Criminality
social history
individualism
reputation
homicide
offense
violence

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Spencer, G., & McAuley, J. W. (2011). Introduction: Politics, identity and change in contemporary loyalism. In J. W. McAuley, & G. Spencer (Eds.), Ulster Loyalism after the Good Friday Agreement: History, Identity and Change (pp. 1-7). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230305830
Spencer, Graham ; McAuley, James W. / Introduction : Politics, identity and change in contemporary loyalism. Ulster Loyalism after the Good Friday Agreement: History, Identity and Change. editor / James W. McAuley ; Graham Spencer. Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. pp. 1-7
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Spencer, G & McAuley, JW 2011, Introduction: Politics, identity and change in contemporary loyalism. in JW McAuley & G Spencer (eds), Ulster Loyalism after the Good Friday Agreement: History, Identity and Change. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230305830

Introduction : Politics, identity and change in contemporary loyalism. / Spencer, Graham; McAuley, James W.

Ulster Loyalism after the Good Friday Agreement: History, Identity and Change. ed. / James W. McAuley; Graham Spencer. Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. p. 1-7.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Spencer G, McAuley JW. Introduction: Politics, identity and change in contemporary loyalism. In McAuley JW, Spencer G, editors, Ulster Loyalism after the Good Friday Agreement: History, Identity and Change. Palgrave Macmillan. 2011. p. 1-7 https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230305830