Investigating the Integrated Psychosocial Model of Criminal Social Identity (IPM-CSI) within a sample of community based youth offenders

Alisa Spink, Daniel Boduszek, Agata Debowska

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Abstract

The current study aimed to explore the correlates of CSI in a single study, using the recently validated MDSI (Measure of Delinquent Social Identity). Path analysis was conducted among a sample of opportunistically selected youth offenders (N = 536; age range from 12 to 17 years), separately for boys ( n = 348; M age = 15.28 years) and girls ( n = 188; M age = 15.23 years). Findings showed a positive significant relationship between interpersonal manipulation and ingroup affect (β = .08) for boys, and a positive significant relationship between interpersonal manipulation and in-group ties (β = .21) for girls. Among boys, the findings revealed a negative significant relationship between self-esteem and cognitive centrality (β = -.13). For girls only, a negative significant relationship was identified between living with parents and associating with
criminal friends (β = -.20). Limitations and advantages, including practical implications, of the current research are discussed, highlighting directions for future research
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment
Early online date7 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Nov 2019

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offender
manipulation
community
path analysis
self-esteem
parents
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title = "Investigating the Integrated Psychosocial Model of Criminal Social Identity (IPM-CSI) within a sample of community based youth offenders",
abstract = "The current study aimed to explore the correlates of CSI in a single study, using the recently validated MDSI (Measure of Delinquent Social Identity). Path analysis was conducted among a sample of opportunistically selected youth offenders (N = 536; age range from 12 to 17 years), separately for boys ( n = 348; M age = 15.28 years) and girls ( n = 188; M age = 15.23 years). Findings showed a positive significant relationship between interpersonal manipulation and ingroup affect (β = .08) for boys, and a positive significant relationship between interpersonal manipulation and in-group ties (β = .21) for girls. Among boys, the findings revealed a negative significant relationship between self-esteem and cognitive centrality (β = -.13). For girls only, a negative significant relationship was identified between living with parents and associating withcriminal friends (β = -.20). Limitations and advantages, including practical implications, of the current research are discussed, highlighting directions for future research",
keywords = "Delinquent social identity, Measure of Delinquent Social Identity, path analysis, youth offenders, delinquent social identity, Integrated Psychosocial model of a Criminal Social Identity (IPM-CSI), the measure of delinquent social identity",
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AU - Boduszek, Daniel

AU - Debowska, Agata

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KW - Integrated Psychosocial model of a Criminal Social Identity (IPM-CSI)

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