Involvement in Innovation: The Role of Identity

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of innovation on organizational members has been examined in various ways. However, relatively few studies have addressed how innovation processes shape people's work-related identities (and vice versa). This chapter argues that the concept of identity is useful for considering the relationship of the person to the organization in the context of innovation. It evaluates the potential contributions of Social Identity Theory and Constructivist/ Constructionist accounts of identity to this area. Finally, it presents data from case studies of innovations in the British health service to illustrate the value of an interpretive approach to identity and innovation.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe International Handbook on Innovation
EditorsLarisa V. Shavinina
PublisherElsevier Inc.
ChapterPart VIII.5
Pages619-630
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9780080524849
ISBN (Print)9780080441986
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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innovation
health service
organization
human being
Values

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King, N. (2003). Involvement in Innovation: The Role of Identity. In L. V. Shavinina (Ed.), The International Handbook on Innovation (pp. 619-630). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-008044198-6/50042-5
King, Nigel. / Involvement in Innovation : The Role of Identity. The International Handbook on Innovation. editor / Larisa V. Shavinina. Elsevier Inc., 2003. pp. 619-630
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King, N 2003, Involvement in Innovation: The Role of Identity. in LV Shavinina (ed.), The International Handbook on Innovation. Elsevier Inc., pp. 619-630. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-008044198-6/50042-5

Involvement in Innovation : The Role of Identity. / King, Nigel.

The International Handbook on Innovation. ed. / Larisa V. Shavinina. Elsevier Inc., 2003. p. 619-630.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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King N. Involvement in Innovation: The Role of Identity. In Shavinina LV, editor, The International Handbook on Innovation. Elsevier Inc. 2003. p. 619-630 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-008044198-6/50042-5