Involving service users in delivering alcohol addiction therapy

Clementinah Rooke, Benjamin Jones, Michele Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Involving and empowering people who use health services, and taking their experiences into account, has evolved from being considered good practice to being duties of the NHS. However, evidence suggests that the rate of progress and change has been slow, despite the constant emphasis on the merits of involving and engaging the public and patients. This article, written in collaboration with two service users, reports on efforts by nursing staff working in alcohol addiction to involve service users in setting up and managing the self-management and recovery training initiative at the Brian Hore Unit, part of the Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust. The article aims to encourage healthcare professionals to appreciate the benefits of proactive patient and public involvement for their organisations and for those who get involved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-48
Number of pages5
JournalNursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)
Volume28
Issue number42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Alcoholism
Delivery of Health Care
Nursing Staff
Self Care
Health Services
Mental Health
Therapeutics

Cite this

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Involving service users in delivering alcohol addiction therapy. / Rooke, Clementinah; Jones, Benjamin; Thomas, Michele.

In: Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987), Vol. 28, No. 42, 18.06.2014, p. 44-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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