‘It’s a whole cultural shift’

understanding learning in cultural commissioning from a qualitative process evaluation

Crone D, Ellis L, Bryan H, Pearce M, Ford J

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This qualitative process evaluation investigated learning from stakeholders (patient representatives, art managers/artists, clinicians and commissioners) involved in a co-produced cultural commissioning grant scheme. The scheme was devised as a mechanism to foster learning between, and within, stakeholder groups and to embed co-production in decision-making in clinical commissioning. The evaluation included respondents (n = 36) from four stakeholder groups in three sequential stages. Findings identified themes centred on outcomes, learning, co-production, and cultural and political change, specifically that stakeholder roles need to be clearly defined and understood and that co-production takes a significant time commitment. Co-production in innovative projects is both complex and challenging. However, despite this, involving stakeholders has benefits for service design and the clinical commissioning process.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalPractice
Early online date6 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Sep 2019
Externally publishedYes

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coproduction
stakeholder
evaluation
learning
cultural change
political change
artist
grant
Group
manager
commitment
art
decision making

Cite this

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‘It’s a whole cultural shift’ : understanding learning in cultural commissioning from a qualitative process evaluation . / D, Crone; L, Ellis; H, Bryan; M, Pearce; J, Ford.

In: Practice, 06.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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