Keepin ya mob healthy: Aboriginal community participation and Aboriginal Health Worker training in Victoria

Karen Adams, Merilyn Spratling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article outlines the development of accredited Aboriginal Health Worker training in Victoria. The processes of community consultation are presented as the primary reason for the successful implementation of the training program in its first year of delivery. The most important community consultation processes involved the active input of Elders and Aboriginal Health Workers. The training was seen as more credible by other Koorie people because of the input of these groups. The supportive role played by both the State and Commonwealth governments as well as industry groups are also explored. The successful implementation of the Aboriginal Health Worker training program demonstrates that Aboriginal people know what is best for them and can effectively initiate, organise and deliver their own culturally appropriate training programs.

LanguageEnglish
Pages116-119
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian Journal of Primary Health
Volume7
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Victoria
Education
Health
Referral and Consultation
State Government
Industry
Community Participation

Cite this

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Keepin ya mob healthy : Aboriginal community participation and Aboriginal Health Worker training in Victoria. / Adams, Karen; Spratling, Merilyn.

In: Australian Journal of Primary Health, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.12.2001, p. 116-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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