Lactobacillus-produced exopolysaccharides and their potential health benefits: a review

D A Patten, A P Laws

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lactic acid bacteria, such as those of the Lactobacillus genus, naturally reside within the microbiota of the human body and have long been used as starter cultures and probiotic enhancers in fermented foods, such as fermented drinks, yoghurts and cheeses. Many of the beneficial qualities of these bacteria have traditionally been associated with the bacteria themselves, however, a recent spate of studies have demonstrated a wide variety of biological effects exhibited by lactobacilli-produced exopolysaccharides which could, theoretically, confer a range of local and systemic health benefits upon the host. In this review, we discuss the production of exopolysaccharides within the Lactobacillus genus and explore their potential as beneficial bioactive compounds.

LanguageEnglish
Pages457-71
Number of pages15
JournalBeneficial microbes
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Lactobacillus
Insurance Benefits
Bacteria
Yogurt
Microbiota
Probiotics
Cheese
Human Body
Lactic Acid
Food

Cite this

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Lactobacillus-produced exopolysaccharides and their potential health benefits : a review. / Patten, D A; Laws, A P.

In: Beneficial microbes, Vol. 6, No. 4, 2015, p. 457-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Beneficial microbes

AU - Patten, D A

AU - Laws, A P

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KW - Immunologic Factors

KW - Lactobacillus

KW - Polysaccharides, Bacterial

KW - Journal Article

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