Learning, rehabilitation and the arts in prisons: a Scottish case study

Lyn Tett, Kirstin Anderson, Fergus Mcneill, Katie Overy, Richard Sparks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article investigates the role of the arts in enabling prisoners to engage with learning and improve their literacy, and the impact this has on their rehabilitation and desistance from crime. It draws on data collected from prisoners who participated in arts interventions in three different Scottish prisons. It argues that participating in the arts projects built an active learning culture and encouraged the improvement of verbal and written literacy skills through the use of positive pedagogical approaches. In addition participants learned to work together more effectively, developed self-confidence and were more trusting and supportive because they were working together on intensive projects that they had co-devised. For many prisoners participation in the arts projects constructively challenged and disrupted the negative identities that they had internalised. Their public successes in performances before audiences of significant others opened up new personal and social identities (as artists or performers) that helped them to begin to envision an alternative self that in turn motivated them towards future desistance from crime.

LanguageEnglish
Pages171-185
Number of pages15
JournalStudies in the Education of Adults
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2012

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correctional institution
rehabilitation
prisoner
art
learning
literacy
offense
learning culture
self-confidence
artist
participation
performance

Cite this

Tett, Lyn ; Anderson, Kirstin ; Mcneill, Fergus ; Overy, Katie ; Sparks, Richard. / Learning, rehabilitation and the arts in prisons : a Scottish case study. In: Studies in the Education of Adults. 2012 ; Vol. 44, No. 2. pp. 171-185.
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Learning, rehabilitation and the arts in prisons : a Scottish case study. / Tett, Lyn; Anderson, Kirstin; Mcneill, Fergus; Overy, Katie; Sparks, Richard.

In: Studies in the Education of Adults, Vol. 44, No. 2, 01.09.2012, p. 171-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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