Lost in Implementation: NSW police force crime prevention officer perspectives on crime prevention through environmental design

Garner Clancey, Leanne Monchuk, Jessica Anderson, Justin Ellis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) is practiced by various professions and agencies in many jurisdictions. The role police play in CPTED has received limited scrutiny from academics within Australia (and other countries). This article makes an important contribution to addressing this gap in the literature through providing New South Wales Police Force Crime Prevention Officers (CPOs) perspectives on their role in reviewing council development applications from a CPTED perspective. Findings show police-council relations vary considerably. Some police-council areas have clear policies in place to enable police to contribute to reviewing crime risks of development applications, whilst others do not. Many police feel their engagement in the planning and development process is often tokenistic, receiving limited feedback from councils about their recommendations. For these police, they see little ongoing relevance of reviewing development applications. If police are to remain involved, there is a need to develop clearer parameters of how police will contribute and what they can realistically be expected to contribute to this process.

LanguageEnglish
Pages139-153
Number of pages15
JournalCrime Prevention and Community Safety
Volume20
Issue number3
Early online date24 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

environmental design
crime prevention
Crime
Law enforcement
police
Environmental design
jurisdiction
profession
offense
Feedback
Planning
planning

Cite this

@article{0d659261f1164e1f83e5bb3ac335ce85,
title = "Lost in Implementation: NSW police force crime prevention officer perspectives on crime prevention through environmental design",
abstract = "Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) is practiced by various professions and agencies in many jurisdictions. The role police play in CPTED has received limited scrutiny from academics within Australia (and other countries). This article makes an important contribution to addressing this gap in the literature through providing New South Wales Police Force Crime Prevention Officers (CPOs) perspectives on their role in reviewing council development applications from a CPTED perspective. Findings show police-council relations vary considerably. Some police-council areas have clear policies in place to enable police to contribute to reviewing crime risks of development applications, whilst others do not. Many police feel their engagement in the planning and development process is often tokenistic, receiving limited feedback from councils about their recommendations. For these police, they see little ongoing relevance of reviewing development applications. If police are to remain involved, there is a need to develop clearer parameters of how police will contribute and what they can realistically be expected to contribute to this process.",
keywords = "Crime Prevention, CPTED, Police, Crime Prevention Officers, New South Wales, Developmentt Application, Planning, Crime risk assessments, Development application",
author = "Garner Clancey and Leanne Monchuk and Jessica Anderson and Justin Ellis",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1057/s41300-018-0043-x",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "139--153",
journal = "Crime Prevention and Community Safety",
issn = "1460-3780",
publisher = "Palgrave Macmillan Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

Lost in Implementation : NSW police force crime prevention officer perspectives on crime prevention through environmental design. / Clancey, Garner; Monchuk, Leanne; Anderson, Jessica; Ellis, Justin.

In: Crime Prevention and Community Safety, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.08.2018, p. 139-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lost in Implementation

T2 - Crime Prevention and Community Safety

AU - Clancey, Garner

AU - Monchuk, Leanne

AU - Anderson, Jessica

AU - Ellis, Justin

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) is practiced by various professions and agencies in many jurisdictions. The role police play in CPTED has received limited scrutiny from academics within Australia (and other countries). This article makes an important contribution to addressing this gap in the literature through providing New South Wales Police Force Crime Prevention Officers (CPOs) perspectives on their role in reviewing council development applications from a CPTED perspective. Findings show police-council relations vary considerably. Some police-council areas have clear policies in place to enable police to contribute to reviewing crime risks of development applications, whilst others do not. Many police feel their engagement in the planning and development process is often tokenistic, receiving limited feedback from councils about their recommendations. For these police, they see little ongoing relevance of reviewing development applications. If police are to remain involved, there is a need to develop clearer parameters of how police will contribute and what they can realistically be expected to contribute to this process.

AB - Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) is practiced by various professions and agencies in many jurisdictions. The role police play in CPTED has received limited scrutiny from academics within Australia (and other countries). This article makes an important contribution to addressing this gap in the literature through providing New South Wales Police Force Crime Prevention Officers (CPOs) perspectives on their role in reviewing council development applications from a CPTED perspective. Findings show police-council relations vary considerably. Some police-council areas have clear policies in place to enable police to contribute to reviewing crime risks of development applications, whilst others do not. Many police feel their engagement in the planning and development process is often tokenistic, receiving limited feedback from councils about their recommendations. For these police, they see little ongoing relevance of reviewing development applications. If police are to remain involved, there is a need to develop clearer parameters of how police will contribute and what they can realistically be expected to contribute to this process.

KW - Crime Prevention

KW - CPTED

KW - Police

KW - Crime Prevention Officers

KW - New South Wales

KW - Developmentt Application

KW - Planning

KW - Crime risk assessments

KW - Development application

UR - https://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85047336882&origin=resultslist&sort=plf-f&src=s&st1=Lost+in+implementation%3a+NSW+police+force+crime+prevention+officer+perspectives+on+crime+prevention+through+environmental+design&st2=&sid=4035c42949d3de98f8622c80ca941ba5&sot=b&sdt=b&sl=142&s=TITLE-ABS-KEY%28Lost+in+implementation%3a+NSW+police+force+crime+prevention+officer+perspectives+on+crime+prevention+through+environmental+design%29&relpos=0&citeCnt=0&searchTerm=

U2 - 10.1057/s41300-018-0043-x

DO - 10.1057/s41300-018-0043-x

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 139

EP - 153

JO - Crime Prevention and Community Safety

JF - Crime Prevention and Community Safety

SN - 1460-3780

IS - 3

ER -