Lubricating oil condition monitoring using vibration and air-borne acoustic measurements

A. Albarbar, R. Gennish, F. Gu, A. Ball

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Modern diesel engine maintenance programs incorporate various methods and techniques for early fault detection and diagnosis to maintain efficiency, low pollution and high reliability and to avoid catastrophic failures. This study has been conducted aiming at engine oil condition monitoring and quality evaluation by analysing the engine block vibration and its induced noise. The vibration signals were measured using an accelerometer mounted on the thrust side of the first cylinder in a four cylinder diesel engine, and the noise was recorded using a microphone facing the cylinder. The signals are then band pass filtered and transformed to the frequency domain, where the amplitudes of the different frequency components of the vibration and noise waveforms are analysed and compared to the vibration and noise baseline signatures. The mean amplitudes of the spectral components in the frequency band 900 Hz to 2.5 kHz were found linearly proportional to the engine speed and load. It was also found that the RMS values of this frequency band are affected by the oil viscosity. These results show that it is possible to use vibration and airborne acoustics to predict the quality of lubrication.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASME 7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, ESDA 2004
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Pages205-209
Number of pages5
Volume3
ISBN (Print)9780791841730
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
Event7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis - Manchester, United Kingdom
Duration: 19 Jul 200422 Jul 2004
Conference number: 7

Conference

Conference7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityManchester
Period19/07/0422/07/04

Fingerprint

Lubricating oils
Condition monitoring
Engine cylinders
Vibrations (mechanical)
Diesel engines
Acoustics
Frequency bands
Air
Engines
Microphones
Accelerometers
Fault detection
Failure analysis
Lubrication
Pollution
Viscosity

Cite this

Albarbar, A., Gennish, R., Gu, F., & Ball, A. (2004). Lubricating oil condition monitoring using vibration and air-borne acoustic measurements. In ASME 7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, ESDA 2004 (Vol. 3, pp. 205-209). [ESDA2004-58360] American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/ESDA2004-58360
Albarbar, A. ; Gennish, R. ; Gu, F. ; Ball, A. / Lubricating oil condition monitoring using vibration and air-borne acoustic measurements. ASME 7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, ESDA 2004. Vol. 3 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2004. pp. 205-209
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Albarbar, A, Gennish, R, Gu, F & Ball, A 2004, Lubricating oil condition monitoring using vibration and air-borne acoustic measurements. in ASME 7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, ESDA 2004. vol. 3, ESDA2004-58360, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), pp. 205-209, 7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, Manchester, United Kingdom, 19/07/04. https://doi.org/10.1115/ESDA2004-58360

Lubricating oil condition monitoring using vibration and air-borne acoustic measurements. / Albarbar, A.; Gennish, R.; Gu, F.; Ball, A.

ASME 7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, ESDA 2004. Vol. 3 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2004. p. 205-209 ESDA2004-58360.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Gu, F.

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N2 - Modern diesel engine maintenance programs incorporate various methods and techniques for early fault detection and diagnosis to maintain efficiency, low pollution and high reliability and to avoid catastrophic failures. This study has been conducted aiming at engine oil condition monitoring and quality evaluation by analysing the engine block vibration and its induced noise. The vibration signals were measured using an accelerometer mounted on the thrust side of the first cylinder in a four cylinder diesel engine, and the noise was recorded using a microphone facing the cylinder. The signals are then band pass filtered and transformed to the frequency domain, where the amplitudes of the different frequency components of the vibration and noise waveforms are analysed and compared to the vibration and noise baseline signatures. The mean amplitudes of the spectral components in the frequency band 900 Hz to 2.5 kHz were found linearly proportional to the engine speed and load. It was also found that the RMS values of this frequency band are affected by the oil viscosity. These results show that it is possible to use vibration and airborne acoustics to predict the quality of lubrication.

AB - Modern diesel engine maintenance programs incorporate various methods and techniques for early fault detection and diagnosis to maintain efficiency, low pollution and high reliability and to avoid catastrophic failures. This study has been conducted aiming at engine oil condition monitoring and quality evaluation by analysing the engine block vibration and its induced noise. The vibration signals were measured using an accelerometer mounted on the thrust side of the first cylinder in a four cylinder diesel engine, and the noise was recorded using a microphone facing the cylinder. The signals are then band pass filtered and transformed to the frequency domain, where the amplitudes of the different frequency components of the vibration and noise waveforms are analysed and compared to the vibration and noise baseline signatures. The mean amplitudes of the spectral components in the frequency band 900 Hz to 2.5 kHz were found linearly proportional to the engine speed and load. It was also found that the RMS values of this frequency band are affected by the oil viscosity. These results show that it is possible to use vibration and airborne acoustics to predict the quality of lubrication.

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KW - Condition monitoring

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Albarbar A, Gennish R, Gu F, Ball A. Lubricating oil condition monitoring using vibration and air-borne acoustic measurements. In ASME 7th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, ESDA 2004. Vol. 3. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2004. p. 205-209. ESDA2004-58360 https://doi.org/10.1115/ESDA2004-58360