Managing corporate community responsibility in multinational corporations: Resolving institutional duality

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Abstract

Addressing calls to explore how subsidiaries of MNCs operating in different institutional contexts resolve institutional duality, this paper brings together dual theoretical explanations from legitimacy and neo-institutional theory, to examine how decision-making for corporate community responsibility (CCR) occurs across ten subsidiaries operating in Sri Lanka. Using qualitative data, it shows that while subsidiaries’ implementation of local CCR conform to that of their parents at an aggregate level, those subsidiaries encountering higher levels of institutional conflict in the host-country, are sanctioned by their parent companies to de-couple their local CCR projects. These findings raise interesting questions about the dynamism in subsidiary responses to resolving institutional duality relevant for future scholarly research.
LanguageEnglish
Article number101911
Pages1-19
Number of pages19
JournalLong Range Planning
Early online date29 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Aug 2019

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multinational corporation
responsibility
parents
community
dynamism
Sri Lanka
legitimacy
decision making
Responsibility
Subsidiaries
Multinational corporations
Duality

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abstract = "Addressing calls to explore how subsidiaries of MNCs operating in different institutional contexts resolve institutional duality, this paper brings together dual theoretical explanations from legitimacy and neo-institutional theory, to examine how decision-making for corporate community responsibility (CCR) occurs across ten subsidiaries operating in Sri Lanka. Using qualitative data, it shows that while subsidiaries’ implementation of local CCR conform to that of their parents at an aggregate level, those subsidiaries encountering higher levels of institutional conflict in the host-country, are sanctioned by their parent companies to de-couple their local CCR projects. These findings raise interesting questions about the dynamism in subsidiary responses to resolving institutional duality relevant for future scholarly research.",
keywords = "Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Community Initiatives, Institutional Duality, Institutional Isomorphism, Multinational Corporations, Legitimacy, Institutional isomorphism, Multinational corporations, Corporate community initiatives, Corporate social responsibility, Institutional duality",
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