Metabolic And Physiological Responses To 120 Minutes Of Soccer-Specific Exercise

Liam Harper, Daniel J. West, Emma J. Stevenson, Mark Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

The metabolic and physiological responses to 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise have been extensively reported. However, the responses to an additional 30 minutes of play (termed extratime; ET) are unclear. This is surprising as performance during ET can determine progression in specific tournament matches. PURPOSE: To profile the metabolic and physiological responses to 120 minutes of simulated soccer match-play. METHODS: Following habituation of protocol-specific practices, 22 university standard soccer players (21 ± 2 y) completed 120 minutes of a soccer-specific protocol. Venous blood was collected during exercise for analysis of blood glucose and lactate, plasma insulin, epinephrine, interleukin-6 (IL-6) glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and plasma volume changes. Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and 15-m sprint velocities were measured throughout exercise. RESULTS: Repeated measures analysis of variance highlighted that exercise significantly influenced all measured variables (p<0.001). Blood glucose, lactate and plasma insulin concentrations were lower (p<0.05) in ET compared to all time points up to, and including 90 minutes (-11%, -15%, -15%, compared to 90 min, respectively). Plasma IL-6, epinephrine, glycerol and NEFA were higher (p<0.05) in ET compared to all time points up to and including 90 minutes (+28%, +110%, +26%, +34%, compared to 90 min, respectively). There were no significant changes in plasma volume or HR during ET compared to the rest of exercise. RPE was higher (p<0.001) during ET compared to the first 90 minutes of exercise (16±2 vs. 13±2). Sprint velocities (15-m) were lower during ET compared to the first 90 minutes of exercise (4.98 ± 0.29 vs. 5.43 ± 0.38 ms-1; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The ET period elicits different physiological and metabolic responses to those observed during the prior 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise. Reductions in blood glucose and lactate with concomitant increases in plasma epinephrine, NEFA and glycerol may demonstrate a greater reliance on fat oxidation and a likely greater dependency on endogenous fuel sources (i.e., muscle and liver glycogen). With reductions in exercise performance (i.e., reduced sprint velocities) and a greater physiological challenge (i.e., increased RPE), interventions that seek to attenuate diminutions in performance provide future research opportunities.
LanguageEnglish
Pages3544
Number of pages1
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume47
Issue number5S
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2015
Externally publishedYes
EventAmerican College of Sports Medicine 62nd Annual Meeting - San Diego, United States
Duration: 26 May 201530 May 2015
http://www.acsmannualmeeting.org/past-meetings/2015-san-diego/

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Soccer
Glycerol
Epinephrine
Blood Glucose
Lactic Acid
Fatty Acids
Plasma Volume
Interleukin-6
Heart Rate
Insulin
Liver Glycogen
Metabolome
Analysis of Variance
Fats
Muscles

Cite this

Harper, Liam ; West, Daniel J. ; Stevenson, Emma J. ; Russell, Mark. / Metabolic And Physiological Responses To 120 Minutes Of Soccer-Specific Exercise. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2015 ; Vol. 47, No. 5S. pp. 3544.
@article{891932ec114d4387acea5192c66e7a28,
title = "Metabolic And Physiological Responses To 120 Minutes Of Soccer-Specific Exercise",
abstract = "The metabolic and physiological responses to 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise have been extensively reported. However, the responses to an additional 30 minutes of play (termed extratime; ET) are unclear. This is surprising as performance during ET can determine progression in specific tournament matches. PURPOSE: To profile the metabolic and physiological responses to 120 minutes of simulated soccer match-play. METHODS: Following habituation of protocol-specific practices, 22 university standard soccer players (21 ± 2 y) completed 120 minutes of a soccer-specific protocol. Venous blood was collected during exercise for analysis of blood glucose and lactate, plasma insulin, epinephrine, interleukin-6 (IL-6) glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and plasma volume changes. Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and 15-m sprint velocities were measured throughout exercise. RESULTS: Repeated measures analysis of variance highlighted that exercise significantly influenced all measured variables (p<0.001). Blood glucose, lactate and plasma insulin concentrations were lower (p<0.05) in ET compared to all time points up to, and including 90 minutes (-11{\%}, -15{\%}, -15{\%}, compared to 90 min, respectively). Plasma IL-6, epinephrine, glycerol and NEFA were higher (p<0.05) in ET compared to all time points up to and including 90 minutes (+28{\%}, +110{\%}, +26{\%}, +34{\%}, compared to 90 min, respectively). There were no significant changes in plasma volume or HR during ET compared to the rest of exercise. RPE was higher (p<0.001) during ET compared to the first 90 minutes of exercise (16±2 vs. 13±2). Sprint velocities (15-m) were lower during ET compared to the first 90 minutes of exercise (4.98 ± 0.29 vs. 5.43 ± 0.38 ms-1; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The ET period elicits different physiological and metabolic responses to those observed during the prior 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise. Reductions in blood glucose and lactate with concomitant increases in plasma epinephrine, NEFA and glycerol may demonstrate a greater reliance on fat oxidation and a likely greater dependency on endogenous fuel sources (i.e., muscle and liver glycogen). With reductions in exercise performance (i.e., reduced sprint velocities) and a greater physiological challenge (i.e., increased RPE), interventions that seek to attenuate diminutions in performance provide future research opportunities.",
author = "Liam Harper and West, {Daniel J.} and Stevenson, {Emma J.} and Mark Russell",
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Metabolic And Physiological Responses To 120 Minutes Of Soccer-Specific Exercise. / Harper, Liam; West, Daniel J.; Stevenson, Emma J.; Russell, Mark.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 47, No. 5S, 05.2015, p. 3544.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic And Physiological Responses To 120 Minutes Of Soccer-Specific Exercise

AU - Harper, Liam

AU - West, Daniel J.

AU - Stevenson, Emma J.

AU - Russell, Mark

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - The metabolic and physiological responses to 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise have been extensively reported. However, the responses to an additional 30 minutes of play (termed extratime; ET) are unclear. This is surprising as performance during ET can determine progression in specific tournament matches. PURPOSE: To profile the metabolic and physiological responses to 120 minutes of simulated soccer match-play. METHODS: Following habituation of protocol-specific practices, 22 university standard soccer players (21 ± 2 y) completed 120 minutes of a soccer-specific protocol. Venous blood was collected during exercise for analysis of blood glucose and lactate, plasma insulin, epinephrine, interleukin-6 (IL-6) glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and plasma volume changes. Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and 15-m sprint velocities were measured throughout exercise. RESULTS: Repeated measures analysis of variance highlighted that exercise significantly influenced all measured variables (p<0.001). Blood glucose, lactate and plasma insulin concentrations were lower (p<0.05) in ET compared to all time points up to, and including 90 minutes (-11%, -15%, -15%, compared to 90 min, respectively). Plasma IL-6, epinephrine, glycerol and NEFA were higher (p<0.05) in ET compared to all time points up to and including 90 minutes (+28%, +110%, +26%, +34%, compared to 90 min, respectively). There were no significant changes in plasma volume or HR during ET compared to the rest of exercise. RPE was higher (p<0.001) during ET compared to the first 90 minutes of exercise (16±2 vs. 13±2). Sprint velocities (15-m) were lower during ET compared to the first 90 minutes of exercise (4.98 ± 0.29 vs. 5.43 ± 0.38 ms-1; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The ET period elicits different physiological and metabolic responses to those observed during the prior 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise. Reductions in blood glucose and lactate with concomitant increases in plasma epinephrine, NEFA and glycerol may demonstrate a greater reliance on fat oxidation and a likely greater dependency on endogenous fuel sources (i.e., muscle and liver glycogen). With reductions in exercise performance (i.e., reduced sprint velocities) and a greater physiological challenge (i.e., increased RPE), interventions that seek to attenuate diminutions in performance provide future research opportunities.

AB - The metabolic and physiological responses to 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise have been extensively reported. However, the responses to an additional 30 minutes of play (termed extratime; ET) are unclear. This is surprising as performance during ET can determine progression in specific tournament matches. PURPOSE: To profile the metabolic and physiological responses to 120 minutes of simulated soccer match-play. METHODS: Following habituation of protocol-specific practices, 22 university standard soccer players (21 ± 2 y) completed 120 minutes of a soccer-specific protocol. Venous blood was collected during exercise for analysis of blood glucose and lactate, plasma insulin, epinephrine, interleukin-6 (IL-6) glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and plasma volume changes. Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and 15-m sprint velocities were measured throughout exercise. RESULTS: Repeated measures analysis of variance highlighted that exercise significantly influenced all measured variables (p<0.001). Blood glucose, lactate and plasma insulin concentrations were lower (p<0.05) in ET compared to all time points up to, and including 90 minutes (-11%, -15%, -15%, compared to 90 min, respectively). Plasma IL-6, epinephrine, glycerol and NEFA were higher (p<0.05) in ET compared to all time points up to and including 90 minutes (+28%, +110%, +26%, +34%, compared to 90 min, respectively). There were no significant changes in plasma volume or HR during ET compared to the rest of exercise. RPE was higher (p<0.001) during ET compared to the first 90 minutes of exercise (16±2 vs. 13±2). Sprint velocities (15-m) were lower during ET compared to the first 90 minutes of exercise (4.98 ± 0.29 vs. 5.43 ± 0.38 ms-1; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The ET period elicits different physiological and metabolic responses to those observed during the prior 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise. Reductions in blood glucose and lactate with concomitant increases in plasma epinephrine, NEFA and glycerol may demonstrate a greater reliance on fat oxidation and a likely greater dependency on endogenous fuel sources (i.e., muscle and liver glycogen). With reductions in exercise performance (i.e., reduced sprint velocities) and a greater physiological challenge (i.e., increased RPE), interventions that seek to attenuate diminutions in performance provide future research opportunities.

U2 - 10.1249/01.mss.0000479360.39072.84

DO - 10.1249/01.mss.0000479360.39072.84

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 47

SP - 3544

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

T2 - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 5S

ER -