Mice carrying a human GLUD2 gene recapitulate aspects of human transcriptome and metabolome development

Qian Li, Song Guo, Xi Jiang, Jaroslaw Bryk, Ronald Naumann, Wolfgang Enard, Masaru Tomita, Masahiro Sugimoto, Philipp Khaitovich, Svante Pääbo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whereas all mammals have one glutamate dehydrogenase gene (GLUD1), humans and apes carry an additional gene (GLUD2), which encodes an enzyme with distinct biochemical properties. We inserted a bacterial artificial chromosome containing the human GLUD2 gene into mice and analyzed the resulting changes in the transcriptome and metabolome during postnatal brain development. Effects were most pronounced early postnatally, and predominantly genes involved in neuronal development were affected. Remarkably, the effects in the transgenic mice partially parallel the transcriptome and metabolome differences seen between humans and macaques analyzed. Notably, the introduction of GLUD2 did not affect glutamate levels in mice, consistent with observations in the primates. Instead, the metabolic effects of GLUD2 center on the tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that GLUD2 affects carbon flux during early brain development, possibly supporting lipid biosynthesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5358-5363
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume113
Issue number19
Early online date26 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 May 2016

Fingerprint

Metabolome
Transcriptome
Genes
Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes
Carbon Cycle
Glutamate Dehydrogenase
Citric Acid Cycle
Hominidae
Brain
Macaca
Primates
Transgenic Mice
Glutamic Acid
Mammals
Lipids
Enzymes

Cite this

Li, Qian ; Guo, Song ; Jiang, Xi ; Bryk, Jaroslaw ; Naumann, Ronald ; Enard, Wolfgang ; Tomita, Masaru ; Sugimoto, Masahiro ; Khaitovich, Philipp ; Pääbo, Svante. / Mice carrying a human GLUD2 gene recapitulate aspects of human transcriptome and metabolome development. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2016 ; Vol. 113, No. 19. pp. 5358-5363.
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Mice carrying a human GLUD2 gene recapitulate aspects of human transcriptome and metabolome development. / Li, Qian; Guo, Song; Jiang, Xi; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Naumann, Ronald; Enard, Wolfgang; Tomita, Masaru; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Khaitovich, Philipp; Pääbo, Svante.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 113, No. 19, 10.05.2016, p. 5358-5363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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