Moderate and heavy metabolic stress interval training improve arterial stiffness and heart rate dynamics in humans

Mark Rakobowchuk, Emma Harris, Annabelle Taylor, Richard M. Cubbon, Karen M. Birch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditional continuous aerobic exercise training attenuates age-related increases of arterial stiffness, however, training studies have not determined whether metabolic stress impacts these favourable effects. Twenty untrained healthy participants (n = 11 heavy metabolic stress interval training, n = 9 moderate metabolic stress interval training) completed 6 weeks of moderate or heavy intensity interval training matched for total work and exercise duration. Carotid artery stiffness, blood pressure contour analysis, and linear and non-linear heart rate variability were assessed before and following training. Overall, carotid arterial stiffness was reduced (p < 0.01), but metabolic stress-specific alterations were not apparent. There was a trend for increased absolute high-frequency (HF) power (p = 0.10) whereas both absolute low-frequency (LF) power (p = 0.05) and overall power (p = 0.02) were increased to a similar degree following both training programmes. Non-linear heart rate dynamics such as detrended fluctuation analysis (1 - α1) also improved (p > 0.05). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of interval training at improving arterial stiffness and autonomic function, however, the metabolic stress was not a mediator of this effect. In addition, these changes were also independent of improvements in aerobic capacity, which were only induced by training that involved a high metabolic stress.

LanguageEnglish
Pages839-849
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume113
Issue number4
Early online date16 Sep 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Vascular Stiffness
Physiological Stress
Heart Rate
Exercise
Carotid Arteries
Healthy Volunteers
Blood Pressure

Cite this

Rakobowchuk, Mark ; Harris, Emma ; Taylor, Annabelle ; Cubbon, Richard M. ; Birch, Karen M. / Moderate and heavy metabolic stress interval training improve arterial stiffness and heart rate dynamics in humans. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2013 ; Vol. 113, No. 4. pp. 839-849.
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Moderate and heavy metabolic stress interval training improve arterial stiffness and heart rate dynamics in humans. / Rakobowchuk, Mark; Harris, Emma; Taylor, Annabelle; Cubbon, Richard M.; Birch, Karen M.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 113, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 839-849.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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