N-Glycosylation Regulates Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor/EGL-15 Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans in Vivo

Urszula M. Polanska, Laurence Duchesne, Janet C. Harries, David G. Fernig, Tarja K. Kinnunen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The regulation of cell function by fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) classically occurs through a dual receptor system of a tyrosine kinase receptor (FGFR) and a heparan sulfate proteoglycan co-receptor. Mutations in some consensus N-glycosylation sites in human FGFR result in skeletal disorders and craniosynostosis syndromes, and biophysical studies in vitro suggest that N-glycosylation of FGFR alters ligand and heparan sulfate binding properties. The evolutionarily conserved FGFR signaling system of Caenorhabditis elegans has been used to assess the role of N-glycosylation in the regulation of FGFR signaling in vivo. The C. elegans FGF receptor, EGL-15, is N-glycosylated in vivo, and genetic substitution of specific consensusN-glycosylation sites leads to defects in the maintenance of fluid homeostasis and differentiation of sex muscles, both of which are phenotypes previously associated with hyperactive EGL-15 signaling. These phenotypes are suppressed by hypoactive mutations in EGL-15 downstream signaling components or activating mutations in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, respectively. The results show thatN-glycans negatively regulate FGFR activity in vivo supporting the notion that mutation of N-glycosylation sites in human FGFR may lead to inappropriate activation of the receptor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33030-33039
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume284
Issue number48
Early online date2 Oct 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Glycosylation
Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors
Caenorhabditis elegans
Mutation
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase
Phenotype
Craniosynostoses
Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans
Sex Differentiation
Heparitin Sulfate
Fibroblast Growth Factors
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Polysaccharides
Muscle
Homeostasis
Substitution reactions
Chemical activation
Cells
Maintenance
Ligands

Cite this

Polanska, Urszula M. ; Duchesne, Laurence ; Harries, Janet C. ; Fernig, David G. ; Kinnunen, Tarja K. / N-Glycosylation Regulates Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor/EGL-15 Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans in Vivo. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2009 ; Vol. 284, No. 48. pp. 33030-33039.
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N-Glycosylation Regulates Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor/EGL-15 Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans in Vivo. / Polanska, Urszula M.; Duchesne, Laurence; Harries, Janet C.; Fernig, David G.; Kinnunen, Tarja K.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 284, No. 48, 27.11.2009, p. 33030-33039.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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