Negotiating race and religion in the West Midlands: narratives of inclusion and exclusion during the 1967–69 Wolverhampton bus workers’ turban dispute

George Kassimeris, Leonie Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article considers the 1967–1969 Wolverhampton Transport turban dispute in the context of increased anxiety over immigration to the area and Wolverhampton South West MP Enoch Powell’s April 1968 ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech. We trace the narratives of the dispute through letters to the Editor in local newspaper The Express & Star, and argue that the letters column was a site of community construction for writers and readers, which elevated the issue from a trivial industrial dispute to a symbol around which the deep anxieties of race and nation coalesced.

LanguageEnglish
Pages343-365
Number of pages23
JournalContemporary British History
Volume31
Issue number3
Early online date22 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

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religion
immigration
Stars
industrial dispute
Blood
exclusion
blood
Rivers
Religion
inclusion
anxiety
worker
narrative
letters to the editor
river
symbol
newspaper
writer
community
bus

Cite this

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