Neuroreflexotherapy for Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

Gerard Urrútia, Kim Burton, Antoni Morral, Xavier Bonfill, Gustavo Zanoli

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective

To assess the effectiveness of neuroreflexotherapy (NRT) for low back pain (LBP).

Summary of Background Data. 

Few of the alternatives for the management of LBP have a firm base of evidence for their effectiveness. Recently, a new intervention known as NRT has been developed in Spain and has been reported to have favourable results.

Methods. 

Searches were undertaken according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines, and randomized controlled trials that evaluated NRT as treatment for patients with nonspecific LBP were included. A qualitative synthesis and an assessment of methodological quality were undertaken.

Results. 

Three randomized controlled trials were included, with 125 and 148 subjects in control and intervention groups, respectively. NRT was compared with sham in two trials and standard care in one. Individuals receiving active NRT showed significantly better outcomes for pain, mobility, disability, medication use, consumption of resources, and costs. No major side effects were reported by those receiving active NRT.

Conclusions. 

NRT appears to be a safe and effective intervention for nonspecific LBP. This conclusion is limited to three trials conducted by a small number of experienced clinicians. Further trials in other settings are needed to determine whether these favourable results can be generalized.

We performed a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of neuroreflexotherapy (NRT) for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. NRT appears to be a safe and effective intervention for the current episode of nonspecific low back pain as shown by the results of three randomized controlled trials. Generalizability of these promising results in other settings as well as the long-term effects of NRT should be assessed in further studies.

 

 

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E148-E153
Number of pages6
JournalSpine
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2005

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Low Back Pain
Randomized Controlled Trials
Back Pain
Spain
Guidelines
Control Groups
Therapeutics

Cite this

Urrútia, Gerard ; Burton, Kim ; Morral, Antoni ; Bonfill, Xavier ; Zanoli, Gustavo. / Neuroreflexotherapy for Nonspecific Low Back Pain : A Systematic Review. In: Spine. 2005 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. E148-E153.
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abstract = "ObjectiveTo assess the effectiveness of neuroreflexotherapy (NRT) for low back pain (LBP).Summary of Background Data. Few of the alternatives for the management of LBP have a firm base of evidence for their effectiveness. Recently, a new intervention known as NRT has been developed in Spain and has been reported to have favourable results.Methods. Searches were undertaken according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines, and randomized controlled trials that evaluated NRT as treatment for patients with nonspecific LBP were included. A qualitative synthesis and an assessment of methodological quality were undertaken.Results. Three randomized controlled trials were included, with 125 and 148 subjects in control and intervention groups, respectively. NRT was compared with sham in two trials and standard care in one. Individuals receiving active NRT showed significantly better outcomes for pain, mobility, disability, medication use, consumption of resources, and costs. No major side effects were reported by those receiving active NRT.Conclusions. NRT appears to be a safe and effective intervention for nonspecific LBP. This conclusion is limited to three trials conducted by a small number of experienced clinicians. Further trials in other settings are needed to determine whether these favourable results can be generalized.We performed a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of neuroreflexotherapy (NRT) for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. NRT appears to be a safe and effective intervention for the current episode of nonspecific low back pain as shown by the results of three randomized controlled trials. Generalizability of these promising results in other settings as well as the long-term effects of NRT should be assessed in further studies.   ",
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Neuroreflexotherapy for Nonspecific Low Back Pain : A Systematic Review. / Urrútia, Gerard; Burton, Kim; Morral, Antoni; Bonfill, Xavier; Zanoli, Gustavo.

In: Spine, Vol. 30, No. 6, 15.03.2005, p. E148-E153.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuroreflexotherapy for Nonspecific Low Back Pain

T2 - A Systematic Review

AU - Urrútia, Gerard

AU - Burton, Kim

AU - Morral, Antoni

AU - Bonfill, Xavier

AU - Zanoli, Gustavo

PY - 2005/3/15

Y1 - 2005/3/15

N2 - ObjectiveTo assess the effectiveness of neuroreflexotherapy (NRT) for low back pain (LBP).Summary of Background Data. Few of the alternatives for the management of LBP have a firm base of evidence for their effectiveness. Recently, a new intervention known as NRT has been developed in Spain and has been reported to have favourable results.Methods. Searches were undertaken according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines, and randomized controlled trials that evaluated NRT as treatment for patients with nonspecific LBP were included. A qualitative synthesis and an assessment of methodological quality were undertaken.Results. Three randomized controlled trials were included, with 125 and 148 subjects in control and intervention groups, respectively. NRT was compared with sham in two trials and standard care in one. Individuals receiving active NRT showed significantly better outcomes for pain, mobility, disability, medication use, consumption of resources, and costs. No major side effects were reported by those receiving active NRT.Conclusions. NRT appears to be a safe and effective intervention for nonspecific LBP. This conclusion is limited to three trials conducted by a small number of experienced clinicians. Further trials in other settings are needed to determine whether these favourable results can be generalized.We performed a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of neuroreflexotherapy (NRT) for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. NRT appears to be a safe and effective intervention for the current episode of nonspecific low back pain as shown by the results of three randomized controlled trials. Generalizability of these promising results in other settings as well as the long-term effects of NRT should be assessed in further studies.   

AB - ObjectiveTo assess the effectiveness of neuroreflexotherapy (NRT) for low back pain (LBP).Summary of Background Data. Few of the alternatives for the management of LBP have a firm base of evidence for their effectiveness. Recently, a new intervention known as NRT has been developed in Spain and has been reported to have favourable results.Methods. Searches were undertaken according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines, and randomized controlled trials that evaluated NRT as treatment for patients with nonspecific LBP were included. A qualitative synthesis and an assessment of methodological quality were undertaken.Results. Three randomized controlled trials were included, with 125 and 148 subjects in control and intervention groups, respectively. NRT was compared with sham in two trials and standard care in one. Individuals receiving active NRT showed significantly better outcomes for pain, mobility, disability, medication use, consumption of resources, and costs. No major side effects were reported by those receiving active NRT.Conclusions. NRT appears to be a safe and effective intervention for nonspecific LBP. This conclusion is limited to three trials conducted by a small number of experienced clinicians. Further trials in other settings are needed to determine whether these favourable results can be generalized.We performed a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of neuroreflexotherapy (NRT) for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. NRT appears to be a safe and effective intervention for the current episode of nonspecific low back pain as shown by the results of three randomized controlled trials. Generalizability of these promising results in other settings as well as the long-term effects of NRT should be assessed in further studies.   

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