NIME, Musicality and Practice-led Methods

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To engage with questions of musicality is to invite into consideration a complex network of topics beyond the mechanics of soundful interaction with our interfaces. Drawing on the work of Born, I sketch an outline of the reach of these topics. I suggest that practice-led methods, by dint of focussing on the lived experience where many of these topics converge, may be able to serve as a useful methodological ‘glue’ for NIME by helping stimulate useful agonistic discussion on our objects of study, and map the untidy contours of contemporary practices. I contextualise this discussion by presenting two recently developed improvisation systems and drawing from these some starting suggestions for how attention to the grain of lived practice could usefully contribute to considerations for designers in terms of the pursuit of musicality and the care required in considering performances in evaluation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression
EditorsBaptiste Caramiaux, Koray Tahiroğlu, Rebecca Fiebrink, Atau Tanaka
PublisherGoldsmiths, University of London, UK
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781906897291
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event14th International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression - Goldsmith, University of London, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 30 Jun 20143 Jul 2014
Conference number: 14
http://www.nime.org/nime2014/ (Link to Call for Participation)

Publication series

NameNIME Proceedings
PublisherNIME
ISSN (Print)2220-4792
ISSN (Electronic)2220-4806

Conference

Conference14th International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression
Abbreviated titleNIME 2014
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period30/06/143/07/14
Internet address

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