Now I like it, now I don’t: Delay effects and retrospective judgment

Silvio Aldrovandi, Marie Poirier, Petko Kusev, Daniel Heussen, Peter Ayton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The present paper tests the widely accepted hypothesis that on-line judgment implies functional independence between memory for, and judgment of, verbal stimuli (e.g., Anderson,1989; Hastie & Park, 1986). In the present study, participants recalled lists of words, after having assessed each for its pleasantness. Presentation position of a negative item within the lists was manipulated. Also, items memorability was manipulated after their presentation – by inserting a filled delay between presentation and the judgment task; in this way, on-line judgment formation was spared. The memory manipulation reduced recall rates for negative items presented in the last position – and their negative influence on pleasantness ratings accordingly. These results contradict the predictions of pure on-line approaches to judgment formation(e.g., Betsch, Plessner, Schwieren, & Gütig, 2001) and suggest that even in on-line judgment tasks, memory plays a role.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Pages2866-2871
Number of pages6
Volume33
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Volume33
ISSN (Print)1069-7977

Cite this

Aldrovandi, S., Poirier, M., Kusev, P., Heussen, D., & Ayton, P. (2011). Now I like it, now I don’t: Delay effects and retrospective judgment. In Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (Vol. 33, pp. 2866-2871). (Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society; Vol. 33).
Aldrovandi, Silvio ; Poirier, Marie ; Kusev, Petko ; Heussen, Daniel ; Ayton, Peter. / Now I like it, now I don’t : Delay effects and retrospective judgment. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Vol. 33 2011. pp. 2866-2871 (Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society).
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abstract = "The present paper tests the widely accepted hypothesis that on-line judgment implies functional independence between memory for, and judgment of, verbal stimuli (e.g., Anderson,1989; Hastie & Park, 1986). In the present study, participants recalled lists of words, after having assessed each for its pleasantness. Presentation position of a negative item within the lists was manipulated. Also, items memorability was manipulated after their presentation – by inserting a filled delay between presentation and the judgment task; in this way, on-line judgment formation was spared. The memory manipulation reduced recall rates for negative items presented in the last position – and their negative influence on pleasantness ratings accordingly. These results contradict the predictions of pure on-line approaches to judgment formation(e.g., Betsch, Plessner, Schwieren, & G{\"u}tig, 2001) and suggest that even in on-line judgment tasks, memory plays a role.",
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Aldrovandi, S, Poirier, M, Kusev, P, Heussen, D & Ayton, P 2011, Now I like it, now I don’t: Delay effects and retrospective judgment. in Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. vol. 33, Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, vol. 33, pp. 2866-2871.

Now I like it, now I don’t : Delay effects and retrospective judgment. / Aldrovandi, Silvio; Poirier, Marie; Kusev, Petko; Heussen, Daniel ; Ayton, Peter.

Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Vol. 33 2011. p. 2866-2871 (Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society; Vol. 33).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

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AB - The present paper tests the widely accepted hypothesis that on-line judgment implies functional independence between memory for, and judgment of, verbal stimuli (e.g., Anderson,1989; Hastie & Park, 1986). In the present study, participants recalled lists of words, after having assessed each for its pleasantness. Presentation position of a negative item within the lists was manipulated. Also, items memorability was manipulated after their presentation – by inserting a filled delay between presentation and the judgment task; in this way, on-line judgment formation was spared. The memory manipulation reduced recall rates for negative items presented in the last position – and their negative influence on pleasantness ratings accordingly. These results contradict the predictions of pure on-line approaches to judgment formation(e.g., Betsch, Plessner, Schwieren, & Gütig, 2001) and suggest that even in on-line judgment tasks, memory plays a role.

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Aldrovandi S, Poirier M, Kusev P, Heussen D, Ayton P. Now I like it, now I don’t: Delay effects and retrospective judgment. In Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Vol. 33. 2011. p. 2866-2871. (Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society).