'Nowhere Else to Turn'

Key Findings from an Evaluation of the Offenders' Families Helpline

Kathryn Sharratt, Jack Porter, Carole Truman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Children and families of offenders have been described as the ‘forgotten victims’ of the Criminal Justice System (CJS), and advocacy groups argue that criminal justice agencies pay insufficient attention to the impact of their processes on families, meaning that their best interests can be overlooked or actively damaged.1 This paper presents findings from an evaluation of the Offenders’ Families Helpline — a free and confidential service providing information, emotional support and signposting to families and friends of offenders involved in any stage of the CJS. In 2013, the Helpline received almost 10,000 telephone calls and over 145,000 unique visitors to its website. The Helpline is funded by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), and at the time of the evaluation was delivered by Partners of Prisoners and Families Support Group (POPS), a voluntary sector organisation based in Manchester. The aims of the evaluation were to assess the extent to which the Helpline meets families’ support needs, and to evidence the impact and outcomes of the Helpline for family members.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-35
Number of pages6
JournalPrison Service Journal
Volume216
Publication statusPublished - 3 Nov 2014

Fingerprint

offender
evaluation
justice
information service
prisoner
telephone
family member
website
Group
management
evidence

Cite this

@article{d8d161076f964656a83cafd456a9101d,
title = "'Nowhere Else to Turn': Key Findings from an Evaluation of the Offenders' Families Helpline",
abstract = "Children and families of offenders have been described as the ‘forgotten victims’ of the Criminal Justice System (CJS), and advocacy groups argue that criminal justice agencies pay insufficient attention to the impact of their processes on families, meaning that their best interests can be overlooked or actively damaged.1 This paper presents findings from an evaluation of the Offenders’ Families Helpline — a free and confidential service providing information, emotional support and signposting to families and friends of offenders involved in any stage of the CJS. In 2013, the Helpline received almost 10,000 telephone calls and over 145,000 unique visitors to its website. The Helpline is funded by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), and at the time of the evaluation was delivered by Partners of Prisoners and Families Support Group (POPS), a voluntary sector organisation based in Manchester. The aims of the evaluation were to assess the extent to which the Helpline meets families’ support needs, and to evidence the impact and outcomes of the Helpline for family members.",
keywords = "Criminal Justice System, Offenders' Families Helpline, offender",
author = "Kathryn Sharratt and Jack Porter and Carole Truman",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "216",
pages = "30--35",
journal = "Prison Service Journal",
issn = "0300-3558",

}

'Nowhere Else to Turn' : Key Findings from an Evaluation of the Offenders' Families Helpline. / Sharratt, Kathryn; Porter, Jack; Truman, Carole.

In: Prison Service Journal, Vol. 216, 03.11.2014, p. 30-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Nowhere Else to Turn'

T2 - Key Findings from an Evaluation of the Offenders' Families Helpline

AU - Sharratt, Kathryn

AU - Porter, Jack

AU - Truman, Carole

PY - 2014/11/3

Y1 - 2014/11/3

N2 - Children and families of offenders have been described as the ‘forgotten victims’ of the Criminal Justice System (CJS), and advocacy groups argue that criminal justice agencies pay insufficient attention to the impact of their processes on families, meaning that their best interests can be overlooked or actively damaged.1 This paper presents findings from an evaluation of the Offenders’ Families Helpline — a free and confidential service providing information, emotional support and signposting to families and friends of offenders involved in any stage of the CJS. In 2013, the Helpline received almost 10,000 telephone calls and over 145,000 unique visitors to its website. The Helpline is funded by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), and at the time of the evaluation was delivered by Partners of Prisoners and Families Support Group (POPS), a voluntary sector organisation based in Manchester. The aims of the evaluation were to assess the extent to which the Helpline meets families’ support needs, and to evidence the impact and outcomes of the Helpline for family members.

AB - Children and families of offenders have been described as the ‘forgotten victims’ of the Criminal Justice System (CJS), and advocacy groups argue that criminal justice agencies pay insufficient attention to the impact of their processes on families, meaning that their best interests can be overlooked or actively damaged.1 This paper presents findings from an evaluation of the Offenders’ Families Helpline — a free and confidential service providing information, emotional support and signposting to families and friends of offenders involved in any stage of the CJS. In 2013, the Helpline received almost 10,000 telephone calls and over 145,000 unique visitors to its website. The Helpline is funded by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), and at the time of the evaluation was delivered by Partners of Prisoners and Families Support Group (POPS), a voluntary sector organisation based in Manchester. The aims of the evaluation were to assess the extent to which the Helpline meets families’ support needs, and to evidence the impact and outcomes of the Helpline for family members.

KW - Criminal Justice System

KW - Offenders' Families Helpline

KW - offender

M3 - Article

VL - 216

SP - 30

EP - 35

JO - Prison Service Journal

JF - Prison Service Journal

SN - 0300-3558

ER -