Organizational innovation in the UK

A case study of perceptions and processes

Nigel King, Neil Anderson, Michael A. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Innovation research has tended to take a ‘top-down’ approach, and has failed to take account of the varying perspectives on the innovation process of different groups within organizations. This paper describes a study in two residential care homes for the elderly which examined inter-group differences in perceptions of the innovation process. Staff were asked to describe the histories of a selected innovation. Content-analysis of transcripts showed that managerial and non-managerial staff groups differed in their emphasis on particular phases of the innovation process, and that managers stressed positive influences on the process to a greater extent than did other staff. The groups agreed on what the sources of influence were. Four factors are suggested which might explain these findings: a group's stake in the innovation, role in the innovation process, identity with the organization, and the effectiveness of inter-group communications. Implications for management and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-339
Number of pages9
JournalWork and Stress
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Organizational Innovation
Group Processes
Home Care Services
Communication
Research

Cite this

King, Nigel ; Anderson, Neil ; West, Michael A. / Organizational innovation in the UK : A case study of perceptions and processes. In: Work and Stress. 1991 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 331-339.
@article{db4a9adda7ed44b8be2f3a631ed0a5b3,
title = "Organizational innovation in the UK: A case study of perceptions and processes",
abstract = "Innovation research has tended to take a ‘top-down’ approach, and has failed to take account of the varying perspectives on the innovation process of different groups within organizations. This paper describes a study in two residential care homes for the elderly which examined inter-group differences in perceptions of the innovation process. Staff were asked to describe the histories of a selected innovation. Content-analysis of transcripts showed that managerial and non-managerial staff groups differed in their emphasis on particular phases of the innovation process, and that managers stressed positive influences on the process to a greater extent than did other staff. The groups agreed on what the sources of influence were. Four factors are suggested which might explain these findings: a group's stake in the innovation, role in the innovation process, identity with the organization, and the effectiveness of inter-group communications. Implications for management and future research are discussed.",
keywords = "Group-level research, Homes for the elderly, Innovation process, Perceptions of innovations",
author = "Nigel King and Neil Anderson and West, {Michael A.}",
year = "1991",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1080/02678379108257031",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "331--339",
journal = "Work and Stress",
issn = "0267-8373",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

Organizational innovation in the UK : A case study of perceptions and processes. / King, Nigel; Anderson, Neil; West, Michael A.

In: Work and Stress, Vol. 5, No. 4, 10.1991, p. 331-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Organizational innovation in the UK

T2 - A case study of perceptions and processes

AU - King, Nigel

AU - Anderson, Neil

AU - West, Michael A.

PY - 1991/10

Y1 - 1991/10

N2 - Innovation research has tended to take a ‘top-down’ approach, and has failed to take account of the varying perspectives on the innovation process of different groups within organizations. This paper describes a study in two residential care homes for the elderly which examined inter-group differences in perceptions of the innovation process. Staff were asked to describe the histories of a selected innovation. Content-analysis of transcripts showed that managerial and non-managerial staff groups differed in their emphasis on particular phases of the innovation process, and that managers stressed positive influences on the process to a greater extent than did other staff. The groups agreed on what the sources of influence were. Four factors are suggested which might explain these findings: a group's stake in the innovation, role in the innovation process, identity with the organization, and the effectiveness of inter-group communications. Implications for management and future research are discussed.

AB - Innovation research has tended to take a ‘top-down’ approach, and has failed to take account of the varying perspectives on the innovation process of different groups within organizations. This paper describes a study in two residential care homes for the elderly which examined inter-group differences in perceptions of the innovation process. Staff were asked to describe the histories of a selected innovation. Content-analysis of transcripts showed that managerial and non-managerial staff groups differed in their emphasis on particular phases of the innovation process, and that managers stressed positive influences on the process to a greater extent than did other staff. The groups agreed on what the sources of influence were. Four factors are suggested which might explain these findings: a group's stake in the innovation, role in the innovation process, identity with the organization, and the effectiveness of inter-group communications. Implications for management and future research are discussed.

KW - Group-level research

KW - Homes for the elderly

KW - Innovation process

KW - Perceptions of innovations

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026318167&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02678379108257031

DO - 10.1080/02678379108257031

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 331

EP - 339

JO - Work and Stress

JF - Work and Stress

SN - 0267-8373

IS - 4

ER -