Outcomes of an Australian Nursing Student-led School Vision and Hearing Screening Programme

Barry Tolchard, Cynthia M Stuhlmiller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nursing students typically do not undertake clinical training in school settings. However, they are well placed to have a role in providing health screening and education in schools or community health venues under supervision of qualified nurses. This study provides a description and outcomes of a vision and hearing screening programme delivered by university nursing students working out of a student-led clinic situated in an underserved, largely Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in regional Australia. Screening and follow-up data collected from 741 elementary school children indicated some important population patterns and trends, with nearly 30% having identified problems. Anecdotal evidence suggested children who gained treatment had improved school performance. Challenges to follow-up and confounding variables are discussed and a suggestion for future research is offered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-52
Number of pages10
JournalChild Care in Practice
Volume24
Issue number1
Early online date17 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vision Screening
Nursing Students
Hearing
nursing
school
student
health
schoolchild
community
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
supervision
elementary school
nurse
Health Education
university
Nurses
trend
Students
performance
evidence

Cite this

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Outcomes of an Australian Nursing Student-led School Vision and Hearing Screening Programme. / Tolchard, Barry; Stuhlmiller, Cynthia M.

In: Child Care in Practice, Vol. 24, No. 1, 02.01.2018, p. 43-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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